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The Environment and Health Modelling Lab

Developing and applying state-of-the-art modelling tools to investigate environmental health risks

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About

Our mission is to develop innovative epidemiological methods to study the impact of environmental stressors on human health.

Who we are

We are a research team with complementary expertise in biostatistics, epidemiology, data science and climatology, based at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.

About
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The Environment and Health Modelling Lab is a team of researchers based in the Department of Public Health, Environments and Society at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. We have multi-disciplinary expertise spanning biostatistics, environmental epidemiology, data science, statistical computing and climatology.

Our research aims to improve understanding of how environmental factors affect human health. Our work has a strong methodological focus and has contributed to the development of new study designs, statistical methods and modelling techniques for epidemiological analyses. We are exploring and pioneering the use of biostatistical tools and modern computing and data technologies to advance research in these fields.

Our research outputs cover a wide range of areas, including epidemiological studies on health risks associated with non-optimal temperature and air pollution, spatio-temporal modelling and environmental exposures, health impact projections under climate change scenarios and the use of new data technologies for environmental health studies. 

Who we are
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Malcolm
Mistry

Assistant Professor

Pierre
Masselot

Research Fellow

Jacopo
Vanoli

Research Assistant
Rochelle Schneider

Rochelle
Schneider

Honorary Assistant Professor

Imran Ali

Project Coordinator

Arturo
de la Cruz

Research Assistant
Research
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Our main areas of research include:

  • Global Health Modelling
  • Methodologies
  • Statistical Analysis
  • Epidemiology
  • Data Science

We lead the Multi-Country Multi-City (MCC) Collaborative Research Network, an international collaboration of research teams producing epidemiological evidence on associations between environmental stressors, climate, and health.

We have created a Case Time Series Design that can be used in different epidemiologic areas for investigating associations between environmental factors, clinical conditions, or medications.

We have developed a novel method that combines artificial intelligence with remote sensing satellite technologies to produce the most detailed coverage of air pollution in Britain to date.

Resources
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We provide the code for our analysis so our work can be applied elsewhere. Visit the links below:

https://github.com/gasparrini

https://github.com/PierreMasselot

Publications
Publications
Small-area assessment of temperature-related mortality risks in England and Wales: a case time series analysis
Gasparrini, A., Masselot, P. et al.
2022
The Lancet Planetary Health. Vol. 6, Issue 7. https://doi.org/10.1016/S2542-5196(22)00138-3
Comparison of weather station and climate reanalysis data for modelling temperature-related mortality
Mistry, M., Schneider, R., Masselot, P. et al.
2022
Nature Scientific Reports. 12, 5178. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-022-09049-4
Differential mortality risks associated with PM2.5 components
Masselot, P., Sera, F., Schneider, R. et al.
2021
Epidemiology. December 2021. doi: 10.1097/EDE.0000000000001455
The Case Time Series Design
Gasparrini, A.
2021
Epidemiology. 2021 Nov 1;32(6):829-837. doi: 10.1097/EDE.0000000000001410.
A cross-sectional analysis of meteorological factors and SARS-CoV-2 transmission in 409 cities across 26 countries
Sera, F., Armstrong, B., Abbott, S. et al.
2021
Nature Communications. 12, 5968 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-021-25914-8
Mortality risk attributable to wildfire-related PM pollution: a global time series study in 749 locations
Chen, G., Guo, Y, Yue, X. et al.
2021
The Lancet Planetary Health Volume 5, Issue 9, September 2021, Pages e579-e587
The burden of heat-related mortality attributable to recent human-induced climate change
Vicedo-Cabrera, A.M., Scovronick, N., Sera, F. et al.
2021
Nature Climate Change. 11, 492–500 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41558-021-01058-x
Updates
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Both heat and cold increase risk of death in England and Wales but rates vary across geographical areas and population groups

New risk estimates suggest London and other urban areas had the highest heat-related mortality rate, while cold-related deaths were highest in Northern England, Wales and the South West.

Each year in England and Wales, there were on average nearly 800 excess deaths associated with heat and over 60,500 associated with cold between 2000 and 2019, according to a new study published in The Lancet Planetary Health.

Read more about the study.

Specific components of air pollution identified as more harmful than others

Ammonium is one of the specific components of fine particulate matter (PM2.5), that has been linked to a higher risk of death compared to other chemicals found in it, according to a new study in the journal Epidemiology.

Find out more about the largest global analysis on air pollution.

First global study on wildfire pollution reveals important increase in mortality

Wildfire smoke is causing significant excess deaths globally, with the highest impacts in South-East Asia and Central America, according to the largest study of its kind in the Lancet Planetary Health.

Read more about the impact of wildfire smoke.

Global warming already responsible for one in three heat-related deaths

Between 1991 and 2018, more than a third of all deaths in which heat played a role were attributable to human-induced global warming, according to a new study in Nature Climate Change.

Read more on the study on global warming.

 

Artificial intelligence and satellite technologies reveal detailed map of air pollution across Great Britain

A novel method that combines artificial intelligence with remote sensing satellite technologies has produced the most detailed coverage of air pollution in Britain to date.

Read more about the ground-breaking technique.

Training
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Please check back.

Events
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Please check back at a later date.