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From global to local: addressing the threat of AMR to STI control

This two-day conference will bring together experts working at the interface of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and STI research, policy and practice. Themes covered will include surveillance, treatment guidelines, new treatment initiatives, new diagnostic initiatives, antibiotic stewardship, and vaccines.

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Anti-microbial resistance (AMR) in sexually transmitted infections (STIs) is a major public health threat, with Neisseria gonorrhoeae being designated as a “high priority antibiotic resistant pathogen” by the World Health Organization (WHO). In the United Kingdom, the O’Neill review recommended that no antibiotics should be prescribed before an appropriate diagnostic test result is available in high-income countries. This is ambitious for the UK, let alone for most low- and middle-income countries where syndromic management is commonplace. In the absence of new diagnostics, antimicrobials and vaccines, combined with limited AMR surveillance data to inform national and global STI programming, there will be serious global sexual and reproductive health consequences.

This two-day conference will bring together experts working at the interface of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and STI research, policy and practice. Themes covered will include surveillance, treatment guidelines, new treatment initiatives, new diagnostic initiatives, antibiotic stewardship, and vaccines.

The aims of the conference are to:

  • Develop a network to share knowledge and experiences of effective strategies and bottlenecks for tackling STI AMR, both locally and globally
  • Identify bottlenecks and solutions for tackling STI AMR
  • Develop a short- and long-term action plan on STIs and AMR

The conference is being organised by LSHTM’s STI Research Interest Group (STIRIG), co-hosted with and supported by LSHTM’s AMR Centre, Public Health England, Bristol Health Partners’ Sexual Health Improvement Programme Health Integration Team (SHIP), and the World Health Organization.


Who should attend?

Anyone interested in AMR and/or STIs, including but not limited to: researchers, healthcare professionals, policy makers, commissioners and service providers.

View programme

Presentation slides from speakers can be viewed below:

Welcome

Welcome and introduction

Katy Turner – Review of 2018 workshop

 

Setting The Scene

Magnus Unemo – Evolution of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG)

Jorgen Jensen – Emergence of mycoplasma genitalium resistance: What do we know?

 

Surveillance

Michelle Cole – Current situation of AMR in Neisseria gonorrhoeae: The GRASP Experience

Gianfranco Spiteri – Surveillance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae antimicrobial resistance in the European Union and the European Response plan

Ranmini Kularatne – Gonorrhoea prevalence, incidence and resistance burden in South Africa: Trend estimates using the Spectrum-STI model

 

Treatment Guidelines

Jorgen Jensen – Challenges in developing evidence-based recommendations for the treatment of common STIs: Current gaps

Suneeta Soni – UK M. genitalium treatment guidance development

Helen Fifer – Updating the UK national guideline for the management of infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae

Teodora Wi – WHO STI Case Management Guidelines

 

New Treatment Initiatives

Fernando Pascual – GARDP – public health driven development of new treatments for sexually transmitted infections

Jonathan Ross – Gonorrhoea: How should we use new treatments in the future

 

Antibiotic Stewardship

Esmita Charani – Antimicrobial stewardship programmes across different healthcare settings and economies

Nicola Low – Test and treat antimicrobial stewardship: What could possibly go wrong?

Cecilia Ferreyra – Gonorrhoea in the Era of AMR: Diagnostic needs for improved antimicrobial stewardship in low-and middle-income countries (LMICs)

Achyuta V Nori – Challenges of implementing antimicrobial stewardship in sexual health services using a patient-staff co-design approach

Suzanna Francis – STI control in low-and middle-income countries

 

New Diagnostic Initiatives

Emma Harding-Esch – Novel diagnostic technologies for STIs

Paddy Horner – Integrating technologic innovations to improve antimicrobial stewardship and reduce risk from AMR at Unity Sexual Health Services while reducing costs

Sebastian Fuller – Collaboration for diagnostic development and implementation

 

Vaccines

Suzanna Francis and Emma Harding-Esch – STIRIG summary from the STI vaccine workshop

Sami Gottlieb – The Global STI vaccine roadmap: STI vaccine development in the fight against AMR

Katy Turner – Modelling the impact of gonorrhoea vaccination

 

Close

Closing remarks

 

Watch the sessions:

Day 1 Afternoon Session (part recorded)

Day 2 Morning Session (part recorded)

Day 2 Afternoon Session (part recorded)

    Admission

    Admission
    Free but registration is required

    Contact

    Contact