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Modelling to mitigate COVID-19 in a large US city

Dr Lauren Ancel Meyers, University of Texas at Austin

The University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium (UT COVID-19 Modeling Consortium) has played a pivotal role in driving COVID-19 mitigation and public awareness in the city of Austin, Texas since March 2020. With a metropolitan population of over 2.2 million, Austin is the fastest-growing large city in the United States. Our extensive engagement with Austin’s unique Executive COVID-19 Task Force––which includes city leaders, public health officials, CEOs of all hospitals, public school superintendents and academic researchers––provides a new paradigm for action-oriented modelling.

Dr Lauren Ancel Meyers will describe how models shaped the city’s data-driven strategies for enacting and relaxing COVID measures, protecting vulnerable populations, and provisioning health care resources. 

Speaker 

Dr Lauren Ancel Meyers is the Cooley Centennial Professor in biology and statistics at the University of Texas at Austin. For over 20 years, Dr Meyers has pioneered the application of network theory, data-driven models, and machine learning to improve the detection, forecasting and control of emerging viral threats. She is the founding director of the UT COVID-19 Modeling Consortium, which has provided global leadership throughout the pandemic through multiple COVID-19 forecasting dashboards and critical analyses to support pandemic surveillance, response, testing and school opening strategies nationwide.  

Dr Meyers received her BA in mathematics and philosophy at Harvard University and PhD in biology at Stanford University. She was named as one of the top 100 global innovators under age 35 by the MIT Technology Review in 2004 and received the Joseph Lieberman Award for Significant Contributions to Science in 2017. 


Please note that the time listed is Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) 

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