Close
Seminar
series event

Global agricultural production and trade drives infectious disease threats in developing nations

Global agricultural production and trade drives infectious disease threats in developing nations

The global population is predicted to exceed 9 billion by 2050. Ensuring sustainability of agricultural production and its global supply chains is now a worldwide priority and is a fundamental nexus issue that is vital to meeting a range of development and environmental targets, such as the Sustainable Development Goals, Aichi Biodiversity Targets, and the Paris Agreement.   

While such positive and negative impacts of agricultural production and trade have been relatively well characterised across several economic (e.g. improved economic growth, consumer choice, greater system efficiencies), development (e.g. reduction in poverty and hunger, improved livelihoods) and environmental domains (e.g. carbon emissions, air pollution, biodiversity loss), the impacts on human health are less well assessed and could also hinder the achievement of global targets. 

In this seminar, Hiral Shah will present a new study that quantifies the impact of global agricultural production and trade on the burden of infectious diseases. He then tele-connects clear links between human health threats (infectious diseases), an extractive industry (agriculture), and the key supply chains leading out from that industry to final consumers of implicated agricultural products. He will also present preliminary results on how infectious diseases may simultaneously impact agricultural productivity.   

This talk is aimed at anyone interested in how global trade, irresponsible production and consumption can impact human health and sustainability. Researchers, students, physicians, public health practitioners and the general public engaged in infectious disease research, global health or sustainability are all welcome.   

 

About the speaker

Mr Hiral Shah

Hiral Shah is a health economist who is interested in quantifying the impacts of upstream drivers (e.g. land use, climate, trade) or interventions and their potential downstream impacts on human health. He is also interested in the use of economic evaluations to assess the cost-effectiveness of public health, environmental or ecological interventions, pharmaceuticals, vaccines and medical technologies.   

He is a Grantham Institute and Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) funded PhD student with the Science and Solutions for a Changing Planet Doctoral Training Partnership based at the MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis at Imperial College London. He has previously held positions at the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), the Public Health Foundation of India and Bupa Health and Wellbeing UK. He also holds an MSc in Public Health (Health Economics) from LSHTM and a BSc in Applied Chemistry from Aston University.  

 

Watch the session

 

LSHTM Centre on Climate Change & Planetary Health

Admission

Admission
No registration required. Seats available on first come, first served basis.

Contact

Contact