Close

Professor Michel Coleman

BA BM BCh MSc FFPH

Professor
of Epidemiology and Vital Statistics

Room
254

LSHTM
Keppel Street
London
WC1E 7HT
United Kingdom

Tel.
+44 20 7927 2551

Since 1995, he has been Professor of Epidemiology and Vital Statistics at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. He was Deputy Chief Medical Statistician at the Office for National Statistics from 1995 to 2004 and Head of the Cancer and Public Health Unit at the School from 1998 to 2003. He has previously worked for the World Health Organisation at the International Agency for Research on Cancer in Lyon (1987-1991), and was Medical Director of the Thames Cancer Registry in London (1991-1995). His main interests include trends and inequalities in cancer incidence, mortality and survival, and the application of these metrics to public health policy and cancer control. He holds a post as Honorary Consultant in Oncology at UCL Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. He is Head of the Cancer Survival Group.

Affiliations

Department of Non-communicable Disease Epidemiology
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health

Centres

Centre for Global Chronic Conditions

Teaching

He teaches on the MSc Epidemiology and other Master's courses, and supervises Master's and doctoral students. He co-directs the annual short course on cancer survival with Prof Bernard Rachet and Dr Claudia Allemani. He is often invited to teach in other countries.

Research

We are funded as the Cancer Survival Group by a range of charities and government institutions in the UK and overseas, to quantify, describe and explain patterns and trends in cancer survival by socio-economic group, geographic area and ethnicity, in collaboration with many research partners in the UK and around the world. We develop methodology and tools for survival analysis. We maintain tools for cancer survival analysis that we make freely accessible online.

In August 2008, we published the first world-wide comparison of cancer survival, including data for 1.9 million patients diagnosed up to 1999 with a cancer of the breast (F), colon, rectum or prostate in 31 countries on five continents (CONCORD study).

In March 2015, we initiated global surveillance of time trends in cancer survival, by analysing individual data for 25.7 million patients diagnosed during the 15 years 1995-2009 with one of 10 common cancers, in collaboration with 279 cancer registries in 67 countries world-wide (CONCORD-2 study).

In January 2018, we updated the global surveillance of cancer survival trends with individual data on over 37 million adults and children diagnosed during 2000-2014with one of 18 cancers in 71 countries (CONCORD-3). Selected survival estimates have been included by the Organisation of Economic Co-operation and Development in Health at a Glance 2017 as indicators of the quality of healthcare for cancer in 48 countries.

Research Area
Health care policy
Health inequalities
Health outcomes
Health policy
Health systems
Public health
Research : policy relationship
Statistical methods
Surveillance
Capacity strengthening
Disease control
Electronic health records
Equity
Ethics
Global Health
Inequalities
International comparisons
Mixed methods
Discipline
Demography
Epidemiology
GIS/Spatial analysis
Medicine
Statistics
Disease and Health Conditions
Cancer
Cervical cancer
Non-communicable diseases
Country
United Arab Emirates
Argentina
Australia
Austria
Belgium
Bulgaria
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Belarus
Brazil
Canada
Switzerland
Channel Islands
Chile
China
Colombia
Costa Rica
Cuba
Cyprus
Czech Republic
Germany
Denmark
Algeria
Ecuador
Spain
Estonia
Finland
France
United Kingdom
Gibraltar
Gambia, The
Greece
Guatemala
Guam
Hong Kong SAR, China
Croatia
Hungary
Indonesia
India
Ireland
Iran, Islamic Rep.
Iceland
Israel
Italy
Jordan
Japan
Kenya
Korea, Rep.
Kuwait
Lebanon
Libya
Liechtenstein
Lesotho
Lithuania
Latvia
Macao SAR, China
Morocco
Maldives
Mexico
Mali
Malta
Mongolia
Mauritius
Malaysia
Nigeria
Netherlands
Norway
New Zealand
Peru
Philippines
Poland
Puerto Rico
Portugal
West Bank and Gaza
French Polynesia
Qatar
Romania
Russian Federation
Saudi Arabia
Singapore
El Salvador
Serbia
Slovak Republic
Slovenia
Sweden
Thailand
Tunisia
Turkey
Uruguay
United States
South Africa
Region
Arab World
Caribbean small states
East Asia & Pacific (developing only)
East Asia & Pacific (all income levels)
Europe & Central Asia (developing only)
Europe & Central Asia (all income levels)
Euro area
European Union
Latin America & Caribbean (developing only)
Latin America & Caribbean (all income levels)
Middle East & North Africa (all income levels)
Middle East & North Africa (developing only)
North America
OECD members
South Asia
Sub-Saharan Africa (all income levels)
World