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Dr Abigail Page

BA MSc PhD

Research Fellow

Room
148

LSHTM
Keppel Street
London
WC1E 7HT
United Kingdom

Tel.
020 7299 4775

I have been trained as an anthropologist, first at the University of Durham for my BA in Social and Biological Anthropology and then my MSc in Medical Anthropology at University College London. I completed my PhD in Biological Anthrolopology in 2016, specalising in the life history, behaviour and health of hunter-gatherers. 

Since completing my PhD I have been employed as a Research Fellow on the Hunter-Gatherers Resilience Project and a Biological Anthropology Teaching Fellow, both at UCL. 

In 2017 I was awarded a three-years MRC Skills Development Fellowship based at LSHTM which I took up in 2018. I am a member of the Evolutionary Demography Group in the Department of Population Health. 

Affiliations

Department of Population Health
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health

Research

My research is focused on understanding the relationship between the environment (both social and natural) and behaviour, and ultimately how this influences health and wellbeing. My background is in evolutionary approaches to human behaviour (in particular Human Behavioural Ecology), therefore my research seeks to test hypotheses developed from evolutionary theory and ultimately, to understand the function of any given behaviour. My interests are also influenced by Evolutionary Medicine and Applied Evolutionary Anthropology and Demography. 

My PhD research focused on cooperation and life history of the Agta foragers from the Philippines. This research focused on understanding the effect of lifestyle change on the behaviour and health of small-scale populations like the Agta, and how this can help us understand changing aspects of demography. I also explored the importance of the structure of social networks in influencing women's and children's health as well as fertility. 

My Research Fellowship seeks to explore evolutionary concepts of risk and how this effects parental decision making in terms of what care to offer (or not) to children. This research has particular relevance to public health frameworks aiming to improve child health and development in a broad range of contexts. 

Research Area
Child health
Maternal health
Statistical methods
Fertility
Discipline
Anthropology
Country
Philippines