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Gender Violence and Health Centre

Reducing gender-based violence through cutting-edge research

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The Gender Violence & Health Centre is an interdisciplinary research group at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. We are more than 25 researchers with expertise on violence against women, violence against children, violence against men, violence among same-sex people, migration, labour exploitation and human trafficking.

We have been World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre since 2019.

About us

Our research is action-oriented. We aim to better understand how to prevent violence and strengthen community and health systems responses to it.

Themes

Find out more about the major themes covered by our research.

Projects

Read about our current and completed projects.

About us
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The Gender Violence and Health Centre is a multi-disciplinary group dedicated to research on the extent, causes, consequences and prevention of gender based violence.

We work closely with local, national and international partners and stakeholders around the world to identify pressing research needs, conduct action-oriented research, and generate scientific knowledge and evidence on gender-based violence and health to improve the lives of women, children, adolescents and men.

How we work

Our research is action-oriented, its overarching purpose to better understand how to prevent violence and strengthen community and health systems responses to it. We collaborate with policy makers, non-governmental organisations and public health bodies around the world to ensure that the evidence we generate feeds into social change.

Established to tackle violence against women and girls, the Gender Violence & Health Centre was instrumental in bringing the problem of violence against women to global attention. While this is still a core focus of our work, our areas of expertise have now expanded to include:

  • Violence against children and adolescents
  • Human trafficking, migration and labour exploitation
  • Intimate partner violence against men in same-sex relationships

Our team comprises epidemiologists, sociologists, anthropologists, economists and social psychologists and this is reflected in the diverse research methods that we use. 

In particular, we are strong advocates of mixed method and longitudinal designs. When it comes to intervention evaluations we have extensive experience in conducting cluster randomised controlled trials coupled with process evaluations and economic costings – the ‘gold standard’ combo in the evaluation of randomized control trials – but we also recognise the value of quasi-experimental designs utilising quantitative and qualitative evidence, and the importance of theory to underpin both the intervention and its evaluation.

We want to be able to answer not only ‘what works to prevent violence?’, but also the more complex questions of ‘how?’, ‘when?’, ‘where?’ and ‘for whom?’

For this, different and creative methodological approaches are needed.

Where we work

Gender based violence is a global issue, and the international scope of our work reflects this. We work in collaboration with partners all over the world, with an emphasis on low and middle-income countries. Members of the Gender Violence and Health Centre have also led pioneering research into violence against women in conflict affected regions, and among mobile populations.

As well as leading projects in individual countries, we have collaborated in major multi-country studies to estimate global prevalence and impacts of intimate partner violence and child sexual abuse, and to help understand what drives variation in levels of violence around the world.

Our strategic goals

1. Going deeper: advancing theories and understanding determinants, causal pathways and prevention mechanisms related to gender-based violence

To make substantial advances in reducing gender-based violence globally, we need stronger theoretical development and greater understanding of the mechanisms that influence violence. Gender Violence & Health Centre is in a unique position to contribute to the necessary evidence for stronger prevention and responses to violence and abuse because of our interdisciplinary staff and partners and projects in various locations. Collaboratively, we generate cutting edge, scientific evidence on gender-based violence to inform the development of innovative programming to inform improve intervention theories of change and reduce prevalence of gender-based violence.

Over the next three to five years, we are committed to synthesizing current knowledge on developing robust cross-disciplinary methods and actively engaging with academic and non-academic, especially researchers in low- and middle-income countries.  We will utilize multiple data sets to understand differences across age groups, gender, vulnerable sub-populations, regions, and countries. We will examine evidence from trials and programme evaluations to consolidate lessons to inform specialized longitudinal studies on different types of violence and incorporate questions on violence in current surveillance surveys. We will also draw on our history of developing and applying research ethics for violence studies to ensure our upcoming work leads the field in safe and sensitive ethical and safety protocols.

2. Going wider: developing interventions and conduct rigorous evaluations

Growing acknowledgement of the high prevalence of gender-based violence has led to an increased investment in trying to understand what works to address gender-based violence. Yet, to date, we still lack robust knowledge on what works in different settings. As a global leader in evaluation of interventions to prevent violence against women, girls and children, Gender Violence & Health Centre aims to expand this core competency to advance methodological approaches to inform intervention development, conduct impact studies and to support scale up of effective interventions. We will conduct ground breaking formative research to explore approaches to intervention development and adaptation, including identifying key intervention components and exploring multi-component intervention options. We will translate consolidated and emerging knowledge into intervention development and consider how evidence from interventions might be adapted to different settings. We will provide robust economic costings of interventions and evidence of value for money. We will identify scale-up opportunities of promising interventions that need to be further developed or adapted to reach larger populations. We will identify and characterize scale up pathways for different intervention models, including multi-sector intervention delivery models.

3. Going beyond silos: transcending boundaries and bridging silos in work on violence against women, adolescents and children

There is increasing recognition of the interconnections between violence against women and violence against children, and the overlaps with the field of human trafficking and labour exploitation. The Gender Violence & Health Centre is committed to bridging these silos by working across populations (women, men, children, adolescents), themes (physical and sexual violence, emotional abuse, sexual harassment) and disciplines (i.e., anthropology, epidemiology, economics, political science, sociology) settings (e.g., urban, rural, countries, continents, etc.). As always, our work depends on our wide-ranging partnerships (e.g., international organisations, NGOs, national and local governments, local stakeholders, male, female, and young community members).

Who we are
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Researchers
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Directors/founders

Heidi Stockl

Heidi Stöckl
Associate Professor / GVHC Director
Associate Professor in Social Epidemiology

Ana Buller

Ana Buller
Assistant Professor / GVHC Deputy Director
Assistant Professor in Social Science

Dr Charlotte Watts
Charlotte Watts
Professor / Founding Director

Professor of Social and Mathematical Epidemiology (LSHTM)
Chief Scientific Adviser (Department for International Development)
Cathy Zimmerman

Cathy Zimmerman 
Professor / Founding Member

Professor of Migration, Health, Labour Exploitation and Gender Violence

Lori Heise

Lori Heise
Former GVHC director

Professor at Johns Hopkins, Bloomberg School of Public Health
Technical Director, Prevention Collaborative

 

Researchers

Tanya Abramsky

Tanya Abramsky, Research Fellow in Social Epidemiology

Lorraine Bacchus

Lorraine Bacchus, Associate Professor of Social Science

Tara Beattie

Tara Beattie, Assistant Professor of HIV Epidemiology

Beniamino Cislaghi

Beniamino Cislaghi, Assistant Professor in Social Norms

Manuela Colombini

Manuela Colombini, Assistant Professor of Gender Based Violence

Karen Devries

Karen Devries, Associate Professor in Social Epidemiology

Camilla Fabbri

Camilla Fabbri, Research Fellow in Health Economics

Giulia Ferrari

Giulia Ferrari, Research Fellow

Mitzy Gafos

Mitzy Gafos, Associate Professor

Anna Foss

Anna Foss, Associate Professor in Public Health Education and Mathematical Epidemiology

Sheila Harvey

Sheila Harvey, Associate Professor of Clinical and Social Intervention Trials

Mazeda Hossain

Mazeda Hossain, Assistant Professor of Social Epidemiology

Lottie Howard-Merril

Lottie Howard-Merrill, Research Assistant

Marjorie Pichon

Marjorie Pichon, Research assistant, jealousy and IPV collaboration

 

Asunghushe Kayambo

Asungushe Kayombe, Research Fellow (based in Mwanza)

Louise Knight, Research Fellow Nambusi Kyegombe, Assistant Professor of Social and Structural Determinants of Health
Shelley Lees

Shelley Lees, Associate Professor in Anthropology of Gender, Violence and HIV

Michelle Lokot, Research fellow
Joelle Mak

Joelle Mak, Research Fellow

Mahesh Mathpati, Research fellow
Nicola Pocock

Nicola Pocock, Assistant Professor in Migration, Trafficking and Health

Meghna Ranganathan

​​Meghna Ranganathan, Assistant Professor in Social Protection, Economic Empowerment and Health

Marie-Celine Schulte

Marie-Celine Schulte, Research Fellow

Mark Marchant, Research fellow

Sergio Torresrueda

Sergio Torres Rueda, Research fellow

Clare Tanton, Assistant professor in Epidemiology

Anna Vassall

Anna Vassal, Professor of Health Economics

 

​​Support staff

Rosa Arques, Programme Coordinator
Annie Holmes

Annie Holmes, Research Uptake Manager

Michael Naranjo, Administrator Christine McLanachan, Project Manager

PhD students

Alys McAlpine

Alys McAlpine (formerly GVHC Research Fellow)

Philomena Raftery

Philomena Raftery

Susan Kelly
Marie Nodzensky Dan Biswas Darshini Govindasamy
Manuela Balliet Claudia Lo Forte  

​​​​Former members

Erin Stern

Erin Stern, Honorary Research Fellow at LSHTM

Ligia Kiss

Ligia Kiss, Honorary Associate Professor at LSHTM

Michelle Remme

Michelle Remme

Sian Oram

Sian Oram

Holly Prudden

Holly Prudden

 
Themes
Themes
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Established to tackle violence against women and girls, the Gender Violence & Health Centre was instrumental in bringing the problem of violence against women to global attention.

While this is still a core focus of our work, our scope has expanded to include a growing number of projects on violence against children and adolescents. the Gender Violence & Health Centre members also conducted one of the first surveys to estimate prevalence of intimate partner violence against men in same-sex relationships, and have led major studies into human trafficking and labour exploitation.

At the core of all of our work is an understanding of the importance of social norms and power imbalances in perpetuating and creating vulnerabilities to violence. Our action-oriented research aims to equip policy makers, practitioners and activists with the evidence they need to create lasting social change.

Our research explores violence from a range of angles:

  • the prevalence of different forms of violence in diverse settings and populations
  • the causes of violence, from individual-level risk and protective factors to structural risk factors such as social norms and unequal power relationships between women and men.
  • the consequences of violence, ranging from adverse physical and mental health outcomes, to intergenerational cycles of violence and economic costs to society
  • what works to prevent violence, and pathways through which intervention effects are achieved
  • health systems responses to violence

While different types of violence have distinct manifestations and consequences, and necessitate different strategies to combat them, we also recognise the intersections between them – where for example they co-occur within individuals or households, or share common causes. There is growing interest within the Gender Violence & Health Centre to share insights from across the spectrum of violence research and identify opportunities for combined approaches to prevention and response.

We work in collaboration with partners all over the world. Members of the Gender Violence & Health Centre have also led pioneering research into violence against women in countries affected by conflict and humanitarian crises, and among mobile populations.

Our major themes

Extent, causes and consequences of violence against women
Physical or sexual violence is a public health problem that affect more than one third of all women globally.

The Gender Violence & Health Centre has been instrumental in bringing the problem of violence against women to global attention, from its role in early high profile studies such as the WHO Multi-country study on Women’s Health and Domestic Violence, through to the Global Burden Study to document the global prevalence of intimate partner violence. By documenting the extent of Violence against Women, and the physical, mental, social and economic consequences that it has for women, their families, communities and society as a whole, we increase the imperative of the global community to act – both to prevent violence and to respond more effectively to those affected.

Key to preventing violence is an understanding of what causes it. The Ecological Framework developed by Lori Heise, member and former-Director of the Gender Violence & Health Centre, is now widely used by violence researchers, activists and policy makers around the world to acknowledge the different levels at which risk factors for intimate partner violence operate – individual woman, individual man, relationship, community and society. While our research focuses on all of these levels and the interactions between them, a strong focus of much of our current work is on community and societal (or ‘structural’) level factors that drive intimate partner violence risk. These include gender norms and women’s lack of access to education and economic opportunities.

Links between violence against women and HIV are also a major focus of the Centre. Intimate partner violence can be both a cause and consequence of HIV infection, and the two often share common underlying risk factors (such as notions of manhood that condone both men’s power over women and men engaging in risky sexual behaviours).

Our projects use diverse methods, from large-scale multi-country population-based surveys allowing us to make comparisons between settings, through to longitudinal studies that allow us to look at trajectories of risk over time and better disentangle causes versus consequences of intimate partner violence.

Prevention of violence against women and girls

The Gender Violence & Health Centre is at the forefront of research on the prevention of violence against women and girls and is a member of the research consortium implementing the DFID ‘What Works to Prevent Violence’ Global Programme.

Despite recognition of the extent of violence against women and girls and its severe consequences for women and girls around the world, rigorous evidence on what works to prevent violence against women and girls is scarce. The Gender Violence & Health Centre has led some of the first cluster randomised trials of violence against women and girls prevention programmes in low and middle income countries. We have evaluated a broad range of violence against women and girls interventions, including those aiming to empower women socially and economically, those working with men to promote ‘positive masculinities’, and those seeking to mobilise entire communities to challenge the underlying norms and structures that drive high rates of violence against women and girls. We are also interested in the potential for violence against women and girls prevention programmes to impact on other forms of violence such as violence against children, and in how to integrate violence against women and girls and HIV prevention efforts.

A growing evidence base demonstrates that cash transfers have potential to reduce intimate partner violence. Members of the Gender Violence & Health Centre have led qualitative studies to understand the pathways of influence of cash transfers on intimate partner violence and conducted the first review of rigorous studies from low-and middle-income countries, demonstrating that cash transfers decrease intimate partner violence.

Underlying violence against women and girls are usually harmful norms which contribute to these expressions of violence. In order to understand norms that contribute to the sexual abuse and exploitation of adolescents, the Learning Initiative on Norms, Exploitation and Abuse (LINEA), led by Dr Ana Maria Buller was created in 2014. This international multi-pronged project initiative explores how social norms theory can be used to prevent the sexual abuse and exploitation of children and adolescents across the world.

The Gender Violence & Health Centre is involved in all stages of the evaluation process, from formative research around the development and adaptation of intervention approaches and content, through to impact evaluations and research into the adaptation and scale-up of promising intervention models. Economists within our team also work closely alongside epidemiologists and social researchers to cost interventions, a key consideration of policy-makers tasked with deciding which interventions to adopt on a wider scale.

For more information on cash transfers and IPV contact Dr Ana Maria Buller, Dr Meghna Ranganathan, Dr Shelley Lees and Dr Nambusi Kyegombe.

For more information on social norms and sexual exploitation of children contact Dr Ana Maria Buller, Ms Marie-Celine Schule, Ms Lottie Howard-Merrill.

Health system responses to violence against women

Health systems have a crucial role in responding to violence against women as part of a coordinated multi-sector response. Women access health services at multiple points – from primary care and hospital settings through to sexual and reproductive health clinics and HIV services. This provides opportunities for those experiencing violence against womento access support, but health services are often slow to recognise violence, have limited resources, and lack staff trained in how to help. The Gender Violence & Health Centre conducts research into how best to integrate violence against women interventions into health systems and services.

While existing evidence on health systems responses to violence against womenis skewed towards high income countries, the Gender Violence & Health Centre research spans low-, middle- and high-income countries. We have conducted studies in Europe, the Middle East, Asia, sub- Saharan Africa, Latin America and North America. Our work draws on a variety of disciplines including health services research, health systems and policy analysis, social science and economics.

The Gender Violence & Health Centre researchers have undertaken health policy and systems research evaluations of a wide variety of intervention models, including:

One Stop Crisis Centres in Asia; the integration of intimate partner violence screening/services into primary care, sexual and reproductive health and HIV settings in a range of countries the incorporation of an mHealth intimate partner violence intervention into nurse home visitation programmes in the US responses to intimate partner violence in antenatal care settings

 

Our focus extends beyond the evaluation of specific intervention models. Bigger picture questions have included: how to engage key stakeholders in intervention development and evaluation, how to create links between healthcare systems in low- and middle-income countries and community organisations working on violence against women, and identifying opportunities for coordinated responses to intimate partner violence and child maltreatment. Insights from these have helped us to achieve greater influence on policy and programming, and ultimately ensure better outcomes for women and children.

LSHTM is currently Co-Directing an NIHR Global Health Group (HERA) on Health Systems Responses to Violence against Women in low and middle-income countries with the University of Bristol. Further information about HERA (Healthcare Responding to Violence and Abuse) can be found here.

For more information on the Gender Violence & Health Centre research on health systems responses to violence against women, contact Dr Loraine J. Bacchus or Dr Manuela Colombini.

We explore the theoretical underpinnings of how these interventions work, as well as the systems and service factors that may affect their implementation in diverse countries and health settings. Furthermore, we conduct comparative research into promising intervention models, and estimate the relative costs of different health sector interventions.

Research on violence against children

Violence against children occurs in all societies throughout the world. In 2016 it was estimated that half of all children aged 2-17 years – that is 1 billion children –had experienced emotional, physical or sexual violence in the past year.  All too often this violence is carried out by someone the child knows: family members, teachers, schoolmates, boyfriends and employers.

The consequences of this violence can be profound and long-term, affecting children’s physical, psychological and mental health. Children who experience violence are also more likely to perpetrate violence against others later in life, perpetuating cycles of violence in future generations.

Tthe Child Protection Research Group led by Karen Devries is part of the Gender Violence & Health Centre. This research group includes several Gender Violence & Health Centre members and works with partners in low and middle income countries, to better understand the causes and consequences of violence against children, and to develop and evaluate interventions to reduce this violence.

Much of the work of the Child Protection Research Group is focused on the primary prevention of violence. They have led major studies on the development and evaluation of school-based violence prevention strategies, as well as research into community based prevention programming. They also conduct research with children and adolescents identified as high risk or already receiving child protection services, to study resilience and explore how to improve health outcomes among those who have experienced violence.

The Child Protection Research Group uses a range of epidemiological and social research methods, including randomised controlled trials, cross-sectional and cohort studies, qualitative research, evidence synthesis and modelling. They also undertake methodological research into the ethical conduct of child protection research, how to ensure children and adolescents are able to disclose their experiences to researchers, and how to measure experience and use of different forms of violence in different settings.

The Gender Violence & Health Centre benefits from a close relationship – and the exchange of skills, knowledge and ideas – with the Child Protection Research Group. The Learning Initiative on Norms, Exploitation and Abuse (LINEA) was established within the Gender Violence & Health Centre in 2014. This international multi-pronged project explores how social norms theory can be used to prevent the sexual abuse and exploitation of children and adolescents across the world.

An additional focus of the Gender Violence & Health Centre is the intersections between violence against women and violence against children. Areas of interest include the co-occurrence of violence against women and violence agaisnt children within households, intimate partner violence and non-partner sexual violence against adolescent girls, the effects that witnessing intimate partner violence have on children’s well-being and future risk of perpetrating/experiencing intimate partner violence, and the potential for violence against women interventions to impact on children’s wellbeing.

Migration, human trafficking and labour exploitation

We live in an increasingly globalised world. The latest figures suggest that there are approximately one billion people on the move – 258 million international migrants and about 750 million people who have migrated within their own country.  While migration can bring many benefits for individuals, their families and communities of origin and destination, it can also put migrants at risk of abuse, exploitation and adverse health outcomes. The Gender Violence & Health Centre leads pioneering research into the health and well-being of vulnerable mobile groups, including trafficked persons, low-wage migrant workers, refugees and asylum-seekers.

The Gender Violence & Health Centre has been a key player in highlighting the links between trafficking and health. European based studies led by Cathy Zimmerman, a founding member of the Gender Violence & Health Centre, generated the first data on the health risks and outcomes associated with trafficking, while the STEAM study in the Mekong region remains the largest study to date on human trafficking and health.

Our research goes beyond highlighting risks – it is tailored to influence programming and policy and to ultimately improve the lives of migrants. To this end, we have conducted a major evaluation of a multi-country programme to prevent forced labour (SWIFT), developed a migration policy-making framework, engaged heavily with policy makers to ensure effective research uptake, and produced guidance for health care providers on responding to the health needs of trafficked persons.

The Gender Violence & Health Centre work focuses on all stages of the migration process, identifying both the risks and intervention opportunities that can occur at each stage – from pre-departure planning and travel, through to arrival and life at destination, and (in some instances) return to the country of origin. We use mixed methods, quantitative and qualitative, to help understand the complexity of the migration process and diversity of migrants’ experiences.

The Gender Violence & Health Centre has led projects in Asia, Africa, South America and Europe (including the UK). Many of these are multi-country studies, reflecting regional migration flows and challenges.

Our work focuses on the gendered aspects of migration, trafficking and exploitation, recognising the particular vulnerability of women and children to sexual abuse and exploitation, and the experiences of men and boys in situations of hazardous and forced labour.

For more information on the Gender Violence & Health Centre research on migration, human trafficking and labour exploitation, contact Prof Cathy Zimmerman, Dr Ligia Kiss, Dr Nicola Pocock, Ms Alys McApline, Dr. Ana Maria Buller, Dr. Heidi Stöckl and Camilla Fabbri.

Intimate partner violence against men in same sex relationships

Research suggests that at least a third of men in same sex relationships have experienced violence by an intimate partner. Studies from the US indicate that among some populations this figure may be upwards of 75%. And yet, intimate partner violence against men in same sex relationships remains a largely hidden problem.

As with women, the effects of IPV on men’s health and behaviours can be serious and far-reaching. They include increased depressive symptoms, substance abuse, unprotected sex and HIV infection. However, whilst there is a growing body of evidence on health systems interventions for women who experience domestic violence, there is sparse research on the needs of men in same sex relationships, or interventions that may address the specific situations and challenges faced by them.

Men are often reluctant to seek help from services due to the dual stigma of being gay and suffering abuse from a same sex partner. Internalised gender notions about masculine identity may cause men to be silent about their experiences. The heteronormative frameworks within which health system interventions for domestic violence are developed pose an additional barrier to help seeking. Furthermore, bidirectional violence is common within this population, meaning it can be difficult to distinguish ‘victim’ from ‘perpetrator’.

GVHC researcher Dr Loraine J Bacchus led the first UK study (PROVIDE) to explore experiences of domestic violence and associated health problems among gay and bisexual men attending sexual health services, as part of an NIHR programme grant on health sector responses to domestic violence. The research also pilot tested an intervention to help sexual health practitioners identify, support and provide appropriate referrals for men in same sex relationships who are experiencing domestic violence.

Within the context of PROVIDE GVHC Deputy Director Dr Ana Maria Buller, led the first global systematic review on the health outcomes of IPV among MSM which found that MSM who have experienced IPV are more like to be HIV positive, show signs of mental health illness and substance abuse among other detrimental health outcomes.

For further details contact Dr Loraine Bacchus and Dr Ana Maria Buller.

Violence against sex workers
Violence against sex workers

Women who sell sex are at increased risk of violence compared with women in the general population. Recent estimates suggest that between 45% and 75% of female sex workers (FSWs) will experience violence in their lifetime, with between 32% and 56% reporting violence in the past year (Deering AJPH 2014).

As well as experiencing violence from their intimate partners, women who sell sex face violence from a host of other perpetrators, including clients, pimps, madams, the police, other sex workers, strangers and goons/thugs. Women face emotional abuse, physical and sexual violence, financial violence and police extortion, illegal police arrest and incarceration. In most settings, the illegal / unclear legal status of sex work means that women who experience violence rarely report this to the authorities and men who perpetrate violence are rarely bought to justice, enabling them to continue reoffending with impunity (Dunkle AJRI 2012).

Female sex workers are also at greatly increased risk of HIV infection compared with women in the general population (Baral Lancet Infect Dis 2012). There is good evidence from longitudinal cohort studies that women who experience violence are at increased risk of HIV infection (Li JIAS 2014), and this is also true of FSWs. Among women living with HIV, violence also impacts on HIV outcomes, including reducing uptake and adherence of HIV anti-retroviral medicines (Hatcher AIDS 2015).

At LSHTM we have a long history of working with collaborators in India, Kenya and Canada on issues of violence and HIV with female sex worker populations in low- and middle-income countries.

The 10-year Bill and Melinda Gates funded India Avahan programme, found peer-led comprehensive violence and HIV prevention programming was associated with reductions in both violence and HIV among FSWs.

The 7-year MRC-DFID funded Samvedana Plus intervention, has been working in partnership with Karnataka Health Promotion Trust, south India, to reduce violence against FSWs by their intimate partner.

The 3-year MRC-DFID funded Maisha Fiti study in Nairobi, Kenya, is working in partnership with Partners for Health and Development in Africa, and aims to understand the indirect pathways by which violence experience increases HIV risk and the impact of violence and other social factors on ARV uptake and adherence.

For the MAISHA Fiti Research brief, please click here.

For more information on GVHC research on violence against sex workers, contact Dr Tara Beattie.

Violence against sex workers
Humanitarian crises and conflict settings

Gender Based Violence is an important human rights issue in humanitarian settings with long-term consequences for survivors’ health and well-being. As attention to gender-based violence has increased on the global level, gaps in the evidence base for effective programming and understanding of the drivers, patterns and consequences of gender-based violence have become more pressing as humanitarian aid agencies, donors and governments seek guidance on how to create programmes and policies that effectively prevent and respond to gender-based violence.

The Gender Violence & Health Centre lead on gender-based violence and conflict research portfolio is led by Dr Mazeda Hossain who conducts rigorous research that works to improve the evidence base on gender-based violence and health in humanitarian crisis settings. The research projects primarily consist of close collaborations with UN and humanitarian agencies, policymakers, and partners in conflict-affected settings in order to improve the evidence base on violence prevention and response for all survivors of gender based violence; and develop innovative methodological approaches for conducting research in conflict-affected settings.

The research in conflict-affected and humanitarian settings has focused on a range of topics. Some of the major projects include: the development and evaluation of community-based violence prevention programming working with men in conflict settings; understanding how task sharing with refugee community workers is used to deliver gender-based violence services for survivors in a refugee camp context; understanding social norms and barriers to using modern family methods among conflict-affected nomadic communities; and research among adolescent Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh.

The Gender Violence & Health Centre gender-based violence and conflict research portfolio uses a range of epidemiological and social science methods including cluster randomised controlled trials, cohort studies, cross-sectional studies, realist evaluations, qualitative research, social network analysis, mixed methods, and evidence synthesis. She has developed methodological guidance for researching gender-based violence in humanitarian settings using approaches that address the technical and ethical challenges that researchers face, especially in conflict-affected settings.

For more information on the Gender Violence & Health Centre research on humanitarian crises and conflict settings, contact Dr Mazeda Hossain.

 

Projects
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Ongoing projects

Extent, causes and consequences of violence against women and girls
  • MAISHA: Preventing violence against women in Tanzania: Randomized control trial and mixed methods study with the overall aims of: 1) evaluating a social empowerment intervention to prevent intimate partner violence against women; and 2) gaining further insights into the different forms of violence against women, the drivers of violence against women, and the consequences of violence against women. Main contacts: Sheila Harvey, Shelley Lees, Saidi Kapiga
     
  • Investigating the predictors of intimate partner violence: A mixed method longitudinal study in Tanzania longitudinal study of 1200 women in Mwanza, Tanzania over four time points to establish the temporal changes in IPV and to explore risk and protective factors. Main contacts: Heidi Stöckl, Sheila Harvey, Saidi Kapiga and Asungushe Kayombo
     
  • Maisa Fiti: A study among women in Nairobi, Kenya. This 3-year, MRC/DFID funded study will examine the direct and indirect pathways through which violence against women increases their risk of HIV acquisition and disease progression. This includes examining the mental health and stress impact of violence experience and exploring how these relate to changes in systemic and genital inflammation. Main contact: Dr Tara Beattie
     
  • GCRF Economic empowerment and intimate partner violence in Sub-Saharan Africa: Secondary data analysis on economic empowerment and intimate partner violence. Main contacts: Heidi Stöckl, Meghna Ranganatha and Shelley Lees
     
  • Measuring Sustainable Development Goal 5.2.: Creating a WHO database for measuring progress for SDG 5.2. Main contact: Heidi Stöckl
     
  • Indashyikirwa Evaluation: An impact evaluation of a community IPV prevention programme implemented from August 2014-August 2018 in rural Rwanda as part of the Global What Works to Prevent Violence against Women and Girls Programme. Main contact: Erin Stern, Lori Heise
     
  • Improving measures of the gender dimensions of young women’s risk of HIV through transactional sex in Uganda. Main contact: Nambusi Kyegombe
     
  • Understanding and measuring violence by and against men in Tanzania. Main contacts: Heidi Stöckl, Sheila Harvey and Asungushe Kayombo
     
  • LSHTM Learning Initiative on Social Norms and Gender-related harmful practices: Community of practice of practitioners, donors, and scholars investigating the role of social norms in influencing various gender-related harmful practices in low- and mid-income countries. Main contact: Ben Cislaghi
     
  • Learning Initiative on Norms Exploitation and Abuse (LINEA): LINEA is an international, multi-pronged project testing how social norm theory can be used to reduce the sexual exploitation of children and adolescents (SECA) in regions across the world. Main contacts: Ana Maria Buller, Marie Celine Schulte, Lottie Howard
     
  • STRIVE: Research consortium investigating the social norms and inequalities that drive HIV structural drivers for HIV. Main contact: Charlotte Watts, Lori Heise, Mitzy Gafos, Meghan Ranganathan, Tara Beattie
     
  • Conceptualising, defining and measuring sexual harassment: an exploratory study in Tanzania. Main contacts: Heidi Stöckl, Meghna Ranganathan, Bathsheba Mahenge
     
Preventing violence against women and girls
  • Indashyikirwa Evaluation: An impact evaluation of a community IPV prevention programme implemented from August 2014-August 2018 in rural Rwanda as part of the Global What Works to Prevent Violence against Women and Girls Programme. Main contact: Erin Stern, Lori Heise
     
  • What works to prevent violence against women?: DFID funded programme to eliminate violence against women – LSHTM is a core member of the consortium and is the economic evaluation lead. Main Contact: Anna Vassal and Giulia Ferrari
     
  • STRIVE: Research consortium investigating the social norms and inequalities that drive HIV structural drivers for HIV. Main contacts: Mitzy Gafos, Meghna Ranganatan and Tara Beattie
     
  • MAISHA: Preventing violence against women in Tanzania: Randomized control trials and mixed methods study with the overall aims of: 1) evaluating a social empowerment intervention to prevent intimate partner violence against women; and 2) gaining further insights into the different forms of violence against women, the drivers of violence against women, and the consequences of violence against women. Main contacts: Sheila Harvey, Shelley Lees and Saidi Kapiga
     
  • UZIKWASA: Qualitative evaluation of impact of a community based media and behaviour change programme on IPV (Tanga, Tanzania). Main contact: Shelley Lees
     
  • IMAGE longitudinal study on the scale up of the IMAGE (intervention with microfinance for AIDS and gender equity) in South Africa. Main contact: Meghna Ranganathan
     
  • Learning Initiative on Norms Exploitation and Abuse (LINEA): LINEA is an international, multi-pronged project testing how social norm theory can be used to reduce the sexual exploitation of children and adolescents (SECA) in regions across the world. Main contacts: Ana Maria Buller, Marie Celine Schulte and Lottie Howard

 

Health system responses to violence against women
Framework for developing a multi country evaluation of one stop centre evaluation. Main contact: Manuela Colombini.
Violence against children and adolescents
  • Preventing Violence Against Children in and around Schools in Nyarugusu refugee camp. PVAC is a cluster randomised controlled trial of a school-based intervention that uses cognitive behavioural therapy to change teachers’ attitudes, beliefs, and behaviours towards corporal punishment. The study also includes qualitative research, a process evaluation and economic evaluation. Main contacts: Karen Devries and Camilla Fabbri
     
  • Contexts of Violence in Adolescence Cohort Study (CoVAC): CoVAC is a new 5 year longitudinal study examining how experience of violence in adolescence can lead to increased risk of intimate partner violence, poor mental health, and other poor health outcomes in early adulthood. (Uganda). Main contacts: Karen Devries and Louise Knight
     
  • Utoto Salaama/Peaceful Childhood-Formative research to understand and prevent sexual and other forms of violence against children in Zanzibar. Main contact: Shelley Lees
     
  • Learning Initative on Norms Exploitation and Abuse (LINEA): LINEA is an international, multi-pronged project testing how social norm theory can be used to reduce the sexual exploitation of children and adolescents (SECA) in regions across the world. Main contacts: Ana Maria Buller, Marie Celine Schulte and Lotti Howard
     
  • Pilot Trial of Good School Toolkit for secondary schools-Pilot RCT of a complex VAC prevention intervention in secondary schools (Uganda). Main contacts: Karen Devries and Louise Howard
     
  • Health outcomes of child domestic workers. Main contacts: Cathy Zimmerman and Nicola Pocock
     
  • Expanding and building upon DREAMS evaluation –Evaluating the effect of MTV Shuga on sexual health and HIV prevention in adolescents and young adults in South Africa. Main contacts: Isolde Birdthistle, Sian Floyd, Shelley Lees and Nambusi Kyegombe
     
  • Improving measures of the gender dimensions of young women’s risk of HIV through transactional sex in Uganda. Main contact: Nambusi Kyegombe.
Migration, human trafficking and labour exploitation
Humanitarian crisis and violence against women and girls
  • Methodological Innovations for Gender, Justice and Security. Development and testing of innovative methodological approaches for the women, peace and security sectors. Main contacts: Mazeda Hossain (Co-Director), Ligia Kiss and Loraine Bacchus.
     
  • Rohingya Adolescent Research Network. Research network formation for researchers, humanitarians, service providers and policymakers interested in the health, education and violence experiences and needs of stateless adolescent Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh. Main contact: Mazeda Hossain
     
  • What is an effective model of care for survivors of gender-based violence in a refugee camp? Evaluation of a GBV response service in a refugee camp: comprehensive care management with task sharing by refugee community workers. Main contact: Mazeda Hossain
     
  • Contraception without Borders. Social norms influencing modern family planning use among conflict-affected nomadic and semi-nomadic communities: Formative research using social network analysis to develop a community-based intervention. Main contacts: Mazeda Hossain and Ben Cislaghi
     
  • Disability, mental health and violence in humanitarian settings. Cross-sectional study on disability and violence among refugee women in the Dadaab refugee camps. Main contact: Mazeda Hossain

 

Completed projects

Extent, causes and consequences of violence against women and girls
  • Global Burden of Disease Study: Main contacts: Karen Devries Charlotte Watts and Loraine Bacchus
     
  • Intimate partner homicide: Systematic review of the global prevalence of intimate partner homicide – part of the Global Burden of Disease study. Main Contact: Heidi Stöckl
     
  • WHO multi-country study on women’s health and domestic violence. The WHO Multi-country Study on Women’s Health and Domestic Violence against Women was a ground-breaking effort to document the prevalence of intimate partner violence and other forms of violence against women using population-based sampling. It was initially carried out in 15 sites in 10 countries. The study was implemented by WHO, in collaboration with LSHTM, PATH and research institutions and women’s organisations in the participating countries. Main contacts: Charlotte Watts and Lori Heise
     
  • Multivariate analysis of the relation between MDG 3, 4, 5 and 6: Secondary data analysis of associations between HIV and indicators of women’s empowerment: Main contacts: Heidi Stöckl and Charlotte Watts
     
  • Empowering pregnant women in Tanzania to address the double burden of intimate partner violence and HIV: a mixed methods research study: Secondary data analysis postdoctoral fellowship on IPV and HIV in Tanzania. Main contact: Heidi Stöckl
     
  • Understanding partner violence during pregnancy and identifying interventions for its prevention and reduction: Secondary data analysis on IPV during pregnancy in Tanzania. Main contact: Heidi Stöckl
     
  • EMPOWER: Combination HIV prevention for adolescent girls and young women: Demonstration study to evaluate an HIV prevention intervention for adolescent girls and young women that addresses gender-based violence and includes oral PrEP (South Africa and Tanzania). Main contacts: Sheila Harvey, Charlotte Watts and Manuela Colombini
     
  • Formative research on exploitative aspects of transactional sex in Uganda and Tanzania: Qualitative research. Main contact: Ana Maria Buller
     
  • Mathematical modelling of the risk of sexual violence and HIV in conflict settings: Publications on sexual violence in conflict settings were reviewed and a mathematical model describing the probability of HIV acquisition was adapted to include the potential effect of genital injury and used to estimate the relative risk of HIV acquisition in ‘conflict’ versus ‘non-conflict’ situations. An analytical equation was developed to estimate the impact of SV on HIV incidence. Main contacts: Charlotte Watts
Preventing violence against women and girls
  • The SASA! Study: Mixed-methods evaluation of a community mobilisation intervention to prevent violence against women and reduce HIV risk in Kampala, Uganda. (Cluster randomised trial, process evaluation, qualitative study, costing study). Main contact: Karen Devries, Tanya Abramsky, Ligia Kiss and Charlotte Watts
     
  • The Intervention with Microfinance for AIDS and Gender Equity (IMAGE) study: Cluster randomised trial of a microfinance and participatory gender training programme for the prevention of intimate-partner violence and HIV in rural South Africa. Main contact: Charlotte Watts
     
  • Evaluation of “Education is a Conversation”: Cluster RCT of a violence prevention and reproductive and sexual health intervention in conflict-affected Northern Uganda – study dropped after formative and protocol. Main contact: Mazeda Hossain
     
  • Gender norms and economic empowerment intervention to reduce intimate partner violence against women in rural Côte d’Ivoire: a randomized controlled pilot study: RCT evaluation of Village Savings & Loan intervention + gender dialogue group. Main contact: Mazeda Hossain
     
  • Men & Women in Partnership: a cluster randomised trial of an intervention to prevent violence against women in rural Côte d’Ivoire, a conflict-affected setting: RCT evaluation of a men’s group intervention to prevent VAWG in a conflict-affected setting. Main contact: Mazeda Hossain
     
  • Qualitative impact evaluation of RCT on CT, food and vouchers and IPV (Ecuador). Main contact: Ana Maria Buller
     
  • Qualitative evaluation of the Jigisemerjiri cash transfer programme in Mali”.  Main contacts: Nambusi Kyegombe and Shelley Lees
     
  • Samvedana Plus: CRT of intervention to reduce IPV and increase consistent condom use among female sex workers in north Karnataka, India. Main contact: Tara Beattie
     
  • Project Samata (Equality): to support adolescent girls from marginalised communities to enter and remain in secondary school until completion (aged 16), and thereby delay their age at marriage and potential entry into sex work, India. Main contact: Tara Beattie
     
  • Evaluation guidance development for violence prevention programming in conflict settings: Guidance for violence prevention programming in conflict settings (Sub-analysis of Cote d’Ivoire research, systematic review, secondary data analysis). Main contact: Mazeda Hossain
     
  • Review of the global evidence on pathways by which cash transfers impact IPV: Systematic review/secondary data analysis of the pathways through which cash transfers impact on IPV. Main contact: Ana Maria Buller, Meghna Ranganathan and Lori Heise
     
  • Expanding and building upon DREAMS evaluation – evaluating the effect of MTV Shuga on sexual health and HIV prevention in adolescents and young adults in South Africa. Main contact: Nambusi Kyegombe
Extent, causes and consequences of violence against women and girls
  • Good Schools Study -Evaluation of the Good Schools Toolkit to reduce violence against children in primary schools (Uganda) (CRT, qualitative study, process evaluation, economic evaluation).Main contacts: Karen Devries and Louise Knight
     
  • Adaptation of Good Schools Toolkit to secondary schools-Research to inform the adaptation of the Good Schools toolkit to prevent violence against children in secondary schools in Uganda. Main contacts: Karen Devries and Louise Knight
     
  • Know Violence in Childhood Initiative – Evidence reviews. Main contacts: Charlotte Watts, Karen Devries, Manuela Colombini, Loraine Bacchus and Heidi Stöckl
     
  • Project Samata (Equality): to support adolescent girls from marginalised communities to enter and remain in secondary school until completion (aged 16), and thereby delay their age at marriage and potential entry into sex work, India. Main contact: Tara Beattie
     
  • Access to community based child protection mechanisms for children with disabilities (Uganda and Malawi): The project assesses the extent to which children with disabilities are included in community-based child protection mechanisms, and identifies barriers/enablers to inclusion. Main contact: Karen Devries
     
  • Formative research on exploitative aspects of transactional sex in Uganda and Tanzania: Qualitative research on exploitative aspects of transactional sex in Uganda and Tanzania. Main contacts: Ana Maria Buller and Nambusi Kyegombe
Intimate partner violence against men in same sex relationships

PROVIDE: Prevalence of intimate partner violence in gay and bisexual men attending a UK sexual health clinic and pilot educational intervention for sexual health practitioners (UK). Main contacts: Loraine Bacchus and Ana Maria Buller.

Health sector responses to women experiencing violence
  • One Stop Crisis evaluation in Malaysia. Main contact: Manuela Colombini
     
  • Safe & Sound: Process evaluation of RCT trial implementing a brief nurse-led counselling session for abused women attending Antenatal care in South Africa. Main contacts: Manuela Colombini and Heidi Stöckl
     
  • EMPOWER: Combination HIV prevention for adolescent girls and young women: Demonstration study to evaluate an HIV prevention intervention for adolescent girls and young women that addresses gender-based violence and includes oral PrEP. Main contact: Sheila Harvey, Charlotte Watts and Manuela Colombini
     
  • Health sector responses to domestic violence: promising interventions in primary and maternity health care settings in Europe. European multi-country study on interventions for IPV in primary and maternity care settings Main contact: Loraine Bacchus
     
  • DOVE study: Critically exploring the use of mHealth in perinatal health visiting for women exposed to intimate partner violence (North America) Main contact: Loraine Bacchus
     
  • ADVANCE – Addressing domestic violence in antenatal care environments: Policy analysis of how domestic violence is integrated into ANC health systems (Nepal and Sri Lanka) Main contact: Manuela Colombini
     
  • Systematic evidence review of research for health in humanitarian crises (GBV and SRH): Global evidence review on health intervention evidence for the humanitarian sectors – focus on SRH and GBV. (Systematic review/secondary data analysis). Main contact: Mazeda Hossain
     
  • Multi-agency domestic violence intervention for women using maternity and sexual health services in the UK Main contact: Loraine Bacchus.
 Migration, human trafficking and labour exploitation
Humanitarian crisis and violence against women and girls
  • Gender Based Violence Research Methodologies in Humanitarian Settings. Evidence Review and recommendations for conducting research on GBV in humanitarian contexts. Main contact: Mazeda Hossain
  • Improving health and protection responses for male survivors of sexual violence in conflict settings. Workshop co-hosted with the All Survivors Project to understand the health and protection needs and responses for male survivors of sexual violence in conflict settings. Main contact: Mazeda Hossain
  • Engaging Men in Accountable Practice (EMAP) in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Cluster RCT evaluation of a community-based men’s group intervention to prevent VAWG in a conflict-affected setting. Main contact: Mazeda Hossain
  • Men & Women in Partnership: a cluster randomised trial of an intervention to prevent violence against women in rural Côte d’Ivoire, a conflict-affected setting. Cluster RCT evaluation of a community-based men’s group intervention to prevent VAWG in a conflict-affected setting. This study also included a cross-sectional community based study and a nested cohort study. Main contact: Mazeda Hossain
  • Gender norms and economic empowerment intervention to reduce intimate partner violence against women in rural Côte d’Ivoire: a randomized controlled pilot study. RCT evaluation of Village Savings & Loan intervention + gender dialogue group. Main contacts: Mazeda Hossain and Charlotte Watts
  • Gender Based Violence Research Methodologies in Humanitarian Settings: Evidence Review and Recommendations. Research guidance for GBV researchers in humanitarian settings – methodological and ethical guidance. Main contact: Mazeda Hossain
  • Evaluation guidance development for violence prevention programming in conflict settings. Guidance for violence prevention programming in conflict settings. Main contact: Mazeda Hossain
  • Evaluation of UNHCR’s protection strategies. Evaluation of the UNHCR Protection Strategies for refugees: Child protection, Sexual and Gender Based Violence and Education. Main contacts: Mazeda Hossain and Cathy Zimmerman
  • Systematic evidence review of research for health in humanitarian crises: Gender Based Violence and Sexual and Reproductive Health. Global evidence review on health intervention evidence for the humanitarian sectors – focus on GBV and SRH. Main contact: Mazeda Hossain
  • Education is a Conversation. Cluster RCT protocol development and formative research of a violence prevention and sexual and reproductive health intervention in conflict-affected Northern Uganda. Main contact: Mazeda Hossain
  • Mathematical modelling of the risk of sexual violence and HIV in conflict settings. Mathematical model describing the probability of HIV acquisition was adapted to include the potential effect of genital injury and used to estimate the relative risk of HIV acquisition in ‘conflict’ versus ‘non-conflict’ situations. An analytical equation was developed to estimate the impact of SV on HIV incidence. Main contacts: Charlotte Watts, Anna Foss, Cathy Zimmerman and Mazeda Hossain
Publications & resources
Publications and resources
Publications
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Violence against women

The Lancet series on Violence Against Women and Girls

Charlotte WattsCathy Zimmerman,Manuela Colombini and Claudia Garcia Moreno of WHO, co-edited an important collection of papers with The Lancet. Together with a comment by President Jimmy Carter, the papers cover:

  • the evidence base on prevention
  • the health sector response
  • a social and gender norms approach to prevention
  • programming lessons from experience
  • a call for specific action to eliminate violence against women and girls
The Lancet series on Violence Against Women and Girls

Global and regional estimates of violence against women

The first systematic study of the global prevalence of two forms of violence against women (VAW) — violence by an intimate partner and sexual violence by someone other than a partner – was undertaken by the Gender, Violence and Health Centre at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), the World Health Organization (WHO) and the South African Medical Research Council.

Global and Regional estimates of violence against women

WHO Multi-country Study on Women’s Health and Domestic Violence

WHO’s landmark study, conducted with LSHTM, documents violence against women by their intimate partners. This report presents the initial results based on evidence collected from over 24 000 women in 10 countries.

WHO Multi-country Study on Women’s Health and Domestic Violence

SASA!

SASA! means ‘now!’ in Kiswahili. This comprehensive approach combines tools and a systematic process for community mobilisation to prevent violence against women and HIV. SASA! was developed by Raising Voices and is being implemented in Kampala, Uganda by the Centre for Domestic Violence Prevention (CEDOVIP).

The SASA! Study, a cluster randomised controlled trial, assesses the impact of the SASA! programme on violence and HIV prevention.

!SASA - Is Violence Against Women Preventable?

Putting Women First: Ethical and Safety Recommendations for Research on Domestic Violence Against Women

The first ethics recommendations on researching violence against women have been published by Professor Charlotte Watts with WHO.

PUTTING WOMEN FIRST: Ethical and Safety Recommendations for Research on Domestic Violence Against Women

Violence, mobile populations and health

Labour Exploitation, Trafficking and Migrant Health: Multi-country Findings on the Health Risks and Consequences of Migrant and Trafficked Workers

Labour Exploitation, Trafficking and Migrant Health: Multi-country Findings on the Health Risks and Consequences of Migrant and Trafficked Workers

Safer labour migration and community-based prevention of exploitation

Safer labour migration and community-based prevention of exploitation

Health and human trafficking in the Greater Mekong Subregion report

The Study on Trafficking, Exploitation and Abuse in the Mekong Sub-region (STEAM) was launched in Phnom Penh, Cambodia on 18 November 2014. STEAM is a longitudinal survey of health consequences of human trafficking, and offers methodological guidance for the evaluation of a large NGO-funded intervention to prevent trafficking in seven Asian countries.

Health and human trafficking in the Greater Mekong Subregion report

Caring for Trafficked Persons: Guidance for Health Providers

Caring for Trafficked Persons: Guidance for Health Providers Facilitator’s Guide

Stolen Smiles

Stolen Smiles was carried out between 2003 and 2005. It surveyed 207 women in seven European countries who had been trafficked into sex work or sexually abused as domestic labourers. It was also the first study to use epidemiological methods to investigate the physical, sexual and mental health of trafficked women and adolescents.

Stolen Smiles

Impact Case Study

This work was selected for the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine’s application to the Research Excellence Framework 2014 (REF) and was highly rated. The REF is a new system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions.


WHO Ethical and Safety Recommendations for Interviewing Trafficked Women

Intended mainly for researchers, media persons and service providers unfamiliar with the situation of trafficked women, this document aims to build a sound understanding of the risks, ethical considerations, and practical realities related to trafficking of women.

WHO Ethical and Safety Recommendations for Interviewing Trafficked Women

Asylum-seeking Women, Violence & Health: Results from a pilot study in Scotland and Belgium

Asylum-seeking Women, Violence & Health: Results from a pilot study in Scotland and Belgium

Violence against sex workers

Maisha Fiti – briefing note

A three year study with 1000 women in Nairobi, Kenya, examining the associations between violence against women, mental health concerns, alcohol and drug use, biological changes to the immune system and HIV.

Maisha Fiti – briefing note
Updates
Updates List Block
The Politics of Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights in Collaboration with Reproductive Health Matters, GVHC & MARCH

Panel discussion, 6 December 2018

Host: Dr Heidi Stöckl
Moderator: Eszter Kismődi, Chief Executive RHM

Speakers: Faysal El Kak, Vice President FIGO, American University of Beirut; Loveday Penn-Kekana, LSHTM; Anne Philpott, DFID; Edwin J Bernard, Global Co-coordinator, HIV Justice Network; Bianka Vida, University of Surrey and Laura Ferguson University of Southern California.

Politics of SRHR
UK Domestic Violence and Health Research Forum

12 June 2019

GVHC is proud to co-host with UCL the next UK Domestic Violence and Health Research Forum at UCL.

The aim of the UK Domestic Violence and Health forum is to present and share research in the field of domestic violence and health. This includes research in progress, completed research studies and the future direction and challenges arising within these studies, prospective areas of research as well as news and events.

MRC Festival: Maisha Fiti film

Thursday 20 June 2019, 5pm - 6:30pm

Manson Theatre, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine


Join us to watch and discuss a short film that gives voice to sex workers in Nairobi, Kenya: the violence they face and the ways they are coming together to address it. Learn about an innovative study into violence, HIV risk and mental health among sex workers.

Additional details: We particularly welcome community groups, NGOs and funders focused on sex work, violence against women and women’s rights.

Organisers: MRC grantee Maisha Fiti study, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

For more information please contact: Dr Tara Beattie and Annie Holmes.

We are a WHO Collaborating Centre
WHO Collaborating Centre

The Gender Violence and Health Centre became a WHO Collaborating Centre in January 2019

WHO collaborating centres are institutions such as research institutes, parts of universities or academies.  They are designated by the Director-General to carry out activities in support of the WHO’s programmes.

Annual event: 16 days of activism against violence against women
LSHTM Global Health Lecture

Professor Charlotte Watts and Dr Heidi Stöckl presented at the LSHTM Global Health Lecture on 18 February 2019.

GHLS: Gender- based violence and health 18-02-2019 from LSHTM on Vimeo.

GVHC to play key roles in three new collaborations focused on major global challenges
GCRF logo

Professor Cathy Zimmerman is a co-investigator for the South-South Migration, Inequality and Development Hub led by Coventry University, which will investigate how migration in the Global South affects inequalities, labour exploitation and development.

Dr Heidi Stöckl is a co-investigator for the University of Oxford’s Accelerating Achievement for Africa’s Adolescents Hub, for which she will lead the evaluation of a complex social intervention on gender-based violence and WASH.

Dr Mazeda Hossain is a co-Principle Investigator on the Gender, Justice and Security Hub where she will lead a work package on methodological innovations. The Hub, led by the London School of Economics and Political Science, seeks to advance sustainable peace by developing an evidence-base around gender, justice and inclusive security in conflict-affected societies.