Close

Dr Lindsey Wu

PhD

Research Fellow
Epidemiology

Room
390

LSHTM
Keppel Street
London
WC1E 7HT
United Kingdom

I have been affiliated with LSHTM since 2011, through the MSc Public Health from 2011-2013 and a PhD in Epidemiology from 2014-2018. Following my PhD, supervised by Chris Drakeley and Immo Kleinschmidt, I have been a Research Fellow in ITD since 2018. Prior to LSHTM, I worked for over 5 years as a policy analyst in global health financing, researching innovative funding mechanisms for neglected disease R&D. I have also held previous research posts at the MRC Centre for Outbreak Analysis and Modelling at Imperial College London and the Worldwide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN) at the University of Oxford. I have a Bachelor's of Applied Science in Bioengineering and a BA Economics from the University of Pennsylvania and an MSc from the London School of Economics.

Affiliations

Department of Infection Biology
Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases

Centres

Malaria Centre

Teaching

At LSHTM, I have given lectures on the use of serology in epidemiology for the MSc Immunology of Infectious Diseases and the module Vector Biology and Vector-Parasite Interactions. I have helped tutor for the Epidemiology and Control of Malaria module as well as the Distance Learning course Principles of Biostatistics and Epidemiology. 

Research

My research focuses on diagnostics, trial design, and surveillance strategies for malaria elimination. This involves adapting Freedom from Infection models from veterinary epidemiology for malaria surveillance using routine data collected by national malaria control programmes (NMCPs) in health facilities and community surveys. This project is a partnership with the WHO Global Malaria Programme, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and several NMCPs in sub-Saharan Africa, the Asia-Pacific, and Latin America.

My PhD, funded by the UK Medical Research Council, investigated antibody responses against novel serological markers of malaria exposure using multiplexed immuno-assays such as Luminex. To develop these into practical diagnostic tools for surveillance and the evaluation of community-based interventions, antibody responses were analysed as secondary endpoints in a 3-year mass drug administration study in The Gambia. They were also analysed as part of a cluster randomised trial in the Zambezi Region, Namibia, which tested reactive focal mass drug administration and reactive vector control compared to reactive case detection. I have also conducted a number of meta-analyses comparing the sensitivity of commonly used malaria diagnostics (PCR, rapid diagnostic tests, microscopy and serology).

Research Area
Clinical trials
Diagnostics
Surveillance
Bayesian Analysis
Randomised controlled trials
Disease and Health Conditions
Malaria
Country
The Gambia
Indonesia
Laos
Namibia
Vietnam
Region
East Asia & Pacific (developing only)
Latin America & Caribbean (developing only)
Sub-Saharan Africa (developing only)