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Dr Sam Wassmer

Ph.D.

Associate Professor
in Malaria Pathogenesis

Room
236a

LSHTM
Keppel Street
London
WC1E 7HT
United Kingdom

Tel.
+44 (0) 20 7612 7888

Following the completion of his Ph.D. in Marseille, Sam Wassmer joined the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine in 2005, as a post-doctoral fellow. He was based at the Malawi-Liverpool-Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Programme in Blantyre, and was awarded a Wellcome Trust Research Training Fellowship in 2007 to investigate the influence of endothelial responsiveness to TNF on malaria severity and outcome. In parallel, he contributed to seminal work on the pivotal role of endothelial protein C receptor in fatal paediatric cerebral malaria, associating for the first time coagulation and inflammation with parasite sequestration in the brain.

In September 2010, Sam Wassmer was appointed Assistant Professor in the Department of Microbiology at the New York University School of Medicine, where he worked for over 5 years. During this time, he developed several research projects in Rourkela, India, as part of an NIH-funded International Center of Excellence for Malaria Research. His research focuses on the mechanisms underlying the pathological differences in cerebral malaria between African and Southeast Asian populations, the main affected groups. 

Sam Wassmer joined the School in May 2016 as an Associate Professor in Malaria Pathogenesis.

Affiliations

Department of Infection Biology
Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases

Centres

Malaria Centre

Teaching

Sam has successfully completed the Postgraduate Certificate in Learning and Teaching  at the LSHTM and has become an Associate Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (HEA). He has a wide range of teaching activities, which include:

  • malaria blood stages & immunology (Immunology of Parasitic Infection MSc, M3177),
  • malaria pathophysiology (Infectious Diseases by Distance Learning IDM103, IDM213, IDM503)
  • immunopathology of infectious diseases & malaria pathogenesis (Immunology of Infectious Diseases MSc, M3120)
  • MSc exam marking

He is also tutoring for the Immunology of Infectious Diseases MSc and the Medical Parasitology MSc.

Research

Sam Wassmer's team investigates factors that lead to the development of cerebral malaria in patients infected with Plasmodium falciparum. This includes specific virulence factors of the parasite, as well as host-related determinants across cohorts from different age groups and geographic origins. Sam is also interested in the development of cost-effective and easily deployable diagnostic tools, specifically designed for malaria-endemic settings. 

Research Area
Drug discovery and development
Innate immunity
Parasites
Public health
Protozoa
Discipline
Genomics
Immunoepidemiology
Immunopathology
Cell biology
Medicine
Molecular biology
Parasitology
Pathology
Education
Disease and Health Conditions
Infectious disease
Malaria
Neurological disease
Country
Gabon
India
Malawi
Region
South Asia
Sub-Saharan Africa (all income levels)

Selected Publications

P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 variants induce cell swelling and disrupt the blood-brain-barrier in cerebral malaria
Adams Y; Olsen R; Bengtsson A; Dalgaard N; Zdioruk M; Satpathi S; Behera PK; Sahu PK; Lawler S; Qvortrup K
2021
Journal of Experimental Medicine
Clinical and epidemiological characterization of severe Plasmodium vivax malaria in Gujarat, India.
Anvikar AR; van Eijk AM; Shah A; Upadhyay KJ; Sullivan SA; Patel AJ; Joshi JM; Tyagi S; Singh R; Carlton JM
2020
Virulence
Haplotype of RNASE 3 polymorphisms is associated with severe malaria in an Indian population.
Mukhi B; Gupta H; Wassmer SC; Anvikar AR; Ghosh SK
2020
MOLECULAR BIOLOGY REPORTS
Plasmodium falciparum sexual parasites develop in human erythroblasts and affect erythropoiesis.
Neveu G; Richard C; Dupuy F; Behera P; Volpe F; Subramani PA; Marcel-Zerrougui B; Vallin P; Andrieu M; Minz AM
2020
Blood
CD8+ T cells and human cerebral malaria: a shifting episteme.
Rénia L; Grau GE; Wassmer SC
2020
The Journal of clinical investigation
Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging Reveals Different Courses of Disease in Pediatric and Adult Cerebral Malaria.
Sahu PK; Hoffmann A; Majhi M; Pattnaik R; Patterson C; Mahanta KC; Mohanty AK; Mohanty RR; Joshi S; Mohanty A
2020
Clinical Infectious Diseases
Plasmodium vivax in Hematopoietic Niches: Hidden and Dangerous.
Silva-Filho JL; Lacerda MVG; Recker M; Wassmer SC; Marti M; Costa FTM
2020
Trends in parasitology
See more Publications