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Miss Alicia Showering

BSc(Hons) MSc

Research Degree Student

Room
LG17

LSHTM
Keppel Street
London
WC1E 7HT
United Kingdom

My research interests include the microbiome and vector bourne disease. Through an MRC London Intercollegiate Doctoral scholarship I am undertaking my PhD at LSHTM investigating the skin microbiome and human attractiveness to malaria mosquitoes.

Prior to my PhD I obtained an MSc in Epidemiology from LSHTM (2018-19) and a first class BSc(Hons) in Biological Sciences from the University of Liverpool (2015-2018).

For more information on me and my project visit my personal website.

Affiliations

Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases
Department of Disease Control

Centres

Malaria Centre

Teaching

I demonstrate on statistics modules including Statistics for Epidemiology and Population Health (STEPH) and Analysis & Design of Research Studies (ADRS). I teach Entomology practicals and am a distance learning tutor on the Epidemiology and Control of Infectious Diseases in Developing Countries module. I also coordinate “Outbreak Control”, a public engagement workshop funded by MRC LID that introduces GCSE students to careers in public health. 

Research

My PhD project is part of the GenoScent project, an MRC-funded project that aims to investigate the genetic basis of attractiveness to mosquitoes, both in the UK and in a natural host-vector-parasite system in The Gambia. The study will provide insight into the mechanisms that can affect our body odour, and make people more or less attractive to mosquitoes. By collecting body odour from identical and non-identical twins in the UK and The Gambia, we will test the relative attractiveness of twins to the major vector of malaria, Anopheles mosquitoes, in behavioural experiments as well as investigate their odour profiles. My PhD is focused on the skin microbiome of these participants. I will associate the skin microbiome with the body odour and attractiveness to mosquitoes. Understanding the role of the microbiome in how humans produce natural attractants and repellents could be used to develop novel vector control tools in the future.

Research Area
Bacteria
Human genetics
Insects
Disease control
Vector control
Discipline
Genomics
Epidemiology
Microbiology
Molecular biology
Vector biology
Bioinformatics
Entomology
Disease and Health Conditions
Infectious disease
Malaria
Vector borne disease
Country
United Kingdom
The Gambia
Region
Sub-Saharan Africa (all income levels)

Selected Publications

Differential attraction in mosquito-human interactions and implications for disease control.
Martinez J; Showering A; Oke C; Jones RT; Logan JG
2020
Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences
Differential attraction in mosquito-human interactions and implications for disease control: Differential attraction to mosquitoes
Martinez J; Showering A; Oke C; Jones RT; Logan JG
2020
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
See more Publications