Close

Gender pay gap

What is gender pay gap reporting?

The gender pay gap is the percentage difference between the average pay of men and women across the whole workforce.

UK legislation introduced in 2017 requires all organisations with 250 or more employees to publish their gender pay gap figures. These figures include the gender pay gap between both the mean and median average pay as well as average bonus payments. Information on the proportion of men and women that make up each staff pay quartile is also required.

What is the difference between the gender pay gap and equal pay?

It is important to note that gender pay gap analysis is not the same as equal pay analysis.

While the gender pay gap looks at the average pay difference across the whole workforce, equal pay is concerned with employees receiving equal pay for work that is the same or similar, or that is of equal value.

LSHTM undertakes a number of actions to ensure equal pay:

  • Equal pay audits are carried out every two years.
  • A transparent starting salary process is in place.
  • All jobs are evaluated using the Higher Education Role Analysis (HERA) job evaluation scheme.
  • Equal pay training is regularly provided for job evaluation panel members.

Progress has been made in applying consistent and fair salaries for senior academic staff with the introduction of professorial salary banding in 2016. A review of the HERA process at LSHTM was undertaken in 2018 to ensure this process is robust and effective for grading Professional Services posts. Both the professorial salary banding framework and HERA process place a strong focus on fairness and transparency in the setting of salary.

LSHTM uses a 54-point salary scale to ensure parity of salaries. Each year, staff experience is recognised with a salary increase to the next point in the scale until the top of the scale is reached. This is the principal mechanism for rewarding staff at LSHTM.

Once a year, staff may also apply for bonuses or accelerated incremental progression to recognise exceptional achievements. LSHTM awards bonuses to 1-2% of staff each year. Due to the low number of bonuses awarded, the bonus gap figure published as part of gender pay reporting is heavily skewed by the Director’s bonus (publicly available and disclosed as part of the annual report) which also falls into the reporting category.

LSHTM staff also receive the annual pay award paid to all HE staff each year.

Due to the measures above, we are confident that LSHTM’s gender pay gap does not stem from paying men and women differently for the same or equivalent work.

How does gender pay gap reporting apply to LSHTM?

In 2018, LSHTM’s talented and diverse staff community doubled in size when two MRC Units joined the School (in Uganda and The Gambia). We now have over 3000 staff, and for the first time have more people working overseas than in the UK.

However, the Gender Pay Gap reporting requirements only apply to staff subject to English, Scottish or Welsh employment law on the snapshot date (31 March each year). For LSHTM, this group includes all staff who hold contracts with LSHTM terms and conditions, 'InternationalMRC staff, distance learning tutors and casual staff who received pay in the month leading up to the snapshot date. It does not include MRC staff who are employed by their unit locally in Uganda and The Gambia.

LSHTM gender pay gap figures

2020

 

Whilst the government has suspended the mandatory requirement for organisations to submit their Gender Pay Gap figures in 2020 due to the COVID-19 outbreak, we have taken the decision to publish our gender pay gap figures in the interest of transparency and to demonstrate our continued commitment to EDI.

Information about the pay of 1,704 LSHTM employees was returned (i.e. those on the UK payroll), of whom 1,046 were female and 658 were male. For those staff, the gender pay gap data is as follows.

Hourly rate

  • Mean gender pay gap: 16.9%
  • Median gender pay gap: 9.4%

Bonus pay

  • Mean bonus pay gap: 78.3%
  • Median bonus pay gap: 97.5%

Proportion of staff group who received a bonus

  • 1.6% of women
  • 0.3% of men

Proportion of men and women in each quartile

Quartile

% women in quartile

% men in quartile

Top quartile

45.5%

54.5%

Upper middle quartile

62.0%

38.0%

Lower middle quartile

64.6%

35.4%

Lower quartile

71.3%

28.7%

Of the staff captured by the snapshot, 61% were female, with the highest percentages of women at the less senior grades. As with other Higher Education Institutions, the gender pay gap reflects this distribution.

LSHTM awarded bonuses to 2 men and 17 women in the 2019/20 round.

Gender Pay Gap analysis and comparator reviews with other higher education employers will be available once these figures are published.

2019

Information about the pay of 1,604 LSHTM employees was returned (i.e. those on the UK payroll), of whom 997 were female and 607 were male. For those staff, the gender pay gap data is as follows.

Hourly rate

  • Mean gender pay gap: 18.3%
  • Median gender pay gap: 12.5%

Bonus pay

  • Mean bonus pay gap: 93.9%
  • Median bonus pay gap: 60.4%

Proportion of staff group who received a bonus

  • 1.2% of women
  • 1.3% of men

Proportion of men and women in each quartile

Quartile

% women in quartile

% men in quartile

Top quartile

45.3%

54.7%

Upper middle quartile

63.9%

36.1%

Lower middle quartile

66.9%

33.1%

Lower quartile

72.2%

27.8%

Of the staff captured by the snapshot, 62% were female, with the highest percentages of women at the less senior grades. As with other Higher Education Institutions, the gender pay gap reflects this distribution.

LSHTM awarded bonuses to 8 men and 12 women in the 2017/18 round. It is a positive step that the awarding of bonuses in 2017/18 was proportional to the staff pool, however a gap in value still exists. A possible explanation for this gap arising is the link between staff salary and bonus value, which sees men, who are typically in higher-paying roles, receive bonuses of a greater value.

Gender Pay Gap analysis and comparator reviews with other higher education employers will be available once these figures are published.

2018

On the snapshot date (31 March 2017) LSHTM employed 1,550 staff of whom 979 were female and 571 were male.

Hourly rate

  • Mean gender pay gap: 18.0%
  • Median gender pay gap: 9.4%

Bonus pay

  • Mean bonus pay gap: 60.8%
  • Median bonus pay gap: 50.0%

Proportion of staff group who received a bonus

  • 2.9% of women
  • 4.9% of men

Proportion of men and women in each quartile:

Quartile

% women in quartile

% men in quartile

Top quartile

46.7%

53.3%

Upper middle quartile

64.4%

35.6%

Lower middle quartile

67.5%

32.5%

Lower quartile

71.8%

28.2%

At the snapshot date, 63% of LSHTM staff were female, with the highest percentages of women at the more junior grades. As with other Higher Education Institutions (HEIs), the gender pay gap reflects this weighting.

LSHTM awarded bonuses to 28 men and 28 women in the 2016/17 round. The bonus gap arises from proportionately fewer women being awarded bonuses, and the link between staff salary and bonus value. Therefore, men were more likely to receive a higher value of bonus in comparison to women.

Gender pay gap analysis and comparisons with the sector will be available once other institutions have published their figures.

LSHTM is proud of the diversity of its staff and student bodies. LSHTM’s current workforce is 62% female, and women account for 66% of our student population. Whilst there is more work to be done, initiatives are already in place to increase the proportion of women in senior grades, both for academic and professional services roles. LSHTM strives to ensure that principles of equality, diversity and inclusion are engendered by all staff, and are at the heart of our policies, procedures, and our ethos.

What are the causes of the gender pay gap and we are doing about it?

The gender pay gap is the result of the higher representation of women in lower grades compared to the representation in higher grades within a workforce. The causes of the gender pay gap are multifaceted and include; barriers to progression (perceived or actual) to more senior roles, lower rates of recruitment of women to senior roles, the impact of extended periods of leave (e.g. maternity leave) on career progression and the greater likelihood of women having caring responsibilities compared to men.  

LSHTM is proud of the diversity of its staff and student bodies. We strive to ensure that principles of equality, diversity and inclusion are internalised by all staff, and are at the heart of our policies, procedures and our ethos. We also recognise that there is more work to be done to reduce our gender pay gap.

LSHTM has been working on improving and progressing gender equality via Advance HE’s Athena SWAN charter for a number of years and received an Athena SWAN bronze renewal award in 2018. There are a number of actions which have been committed to and are being progressed via our institutional Athena SWAN action plan which aim to increase the proportion of women in senior grades, for both academic and professional services roles.

These actions include:

  • Promotion and career development: Each year, a review of LSHTM’s academic promotions and staff review procedures takes place with the intention of refining procedures to keep them in line with best practice and to ensure these processes are fair and accessible to all staff. Staff are proactively encouraged to apply for promotion when they are ready, and an academic CV review process is in place through which academic staff are able to access career development advice. We also launched a revised and refreshed Mentoring Scheme in December 2018 and this has been positively received by our staff. We have noted via our 2019 Staff Survey that positivity relating to progression and career development is lower for staff with caring responsibilities and we will continue to look at this in more detail with a view to improving this.
  • Recruitment processes: Analysis of our recruitment data shows that when women apply they are just as likely to progress through the recruitment process as men. However, this analysis also shows that fewer women apply to higher grades, for both academic and professional services posts. Therefore, we continue to review how we recruit to higher grades to ensure wide search pools and encouragement for underrepresented groups.
  • Family friendly policies: We are committed to addressing barriers experienced in relation to maternity (or other family related) leave or flexible working to ensure a supportive environment for those with caring responsibilities and minimise impact on career development and progression.

What about other protected characteristics such as ethnicity, has a similar pay gap exercise been completed?

LSHTM has committed to undertaking an ethnicity pay gap analysis during 2020.  

Contact us

Please email Director of HR Kessar Kalim at kessar.kalim@lshtm.ac.uk if you have any queries or require further information.

Further information on LSHTM’s approach to EDI can be found on our EDI webpage.