You are here: Home > Research > Publications > Full record view

Full record view

Back to list

Demand for sanitation in Salvador, Brazil: A hybrid choice approach.

Soc Sci Med, 2011; 72(8):1325-32
Edit
Delete
Code Authors

pub_id
21439700
pubmedid
21439700
ISI
290699700013
reference_type
author
Santos, A.C.; Roberts, J.A.; Barreto, M.L.; Cairncross, S.;
title
Demand for sanitation in Salvador, Brazil: A hybrid choice approach.
secondary_title
Soc Sci Med
ISBNISSN
1873-5347
volume
72
number
8
pages
1325-32
year
2011
abstract
: Funds to promote access to water and sanitation in developing countries are scarce and most of the investments come from the national governments and households sources, not international resources. In many of these countries, mainly in middle income countries, households are paying direct taxes to access these services, and understanding what determines their choice and motivation is fundamental to promote access to them. It has been argued that is not enough to supply a wide range of alternatives unless the individuals can recognise their benefits and sustainability. The objective of this paper is to understand the choice of sanitation technology by residents in the city of Salvador, Brazil. We propose a unique hybrid choice model that incorporates a set of latent attitudinal variables and explains how the demographic factors within a household influence choice. The substantial difference of our hybrid choice model from descriptive frameworks is that it integrates choice and latent variables (such as attitudes and preferences) allowing us to model explicitly the cognitive process that influences sanitation adoption, draw conclusions from cognitive variables associated with individuals' socio-economic and demographic characteristics, and establishes a causal pathway among these variables. The results show that the attributes of health protection, accessibility, privacy, and house modernisation were what households cared about when opting for flush toilet and sewerage connection, rather than the high cost and consequent household socio-economic status associated with them. The hybrid model is statistically consistent with these findings, and seems to fill the gap between behavioural theory and discrete choice models applied to sanitation.
keywords
secondary_author
place_published
publisher
number_of_volumes
tertiary_author
tertiary_title
edition
date
type_of_work
subsidiary_author
alternate_title
call_number
accession_number
custom_1
WOS OK
custom_2
Unknown
custom_3
custom_4
10.1016/j.socscimed.2011.02.018
custom_5
Subscription Required
custom_6
10
label
2016-10-18
notes
Journal Article
url
author_address
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom. andreia.santos@lshtm.ac.uk
library
S0277-9536(11)00105-5 10.1016/j.socscimed.2011.02.018 21439700
date_accepted
date_online
created
2011-04-01 10:01:57
modified
2016-07-08 00:00:00
library

<ArticleId IdType="pii">S0277-9536(11)00105-5</ArticleId>
<ArticleId IdType="doi">10.1016/j.socscimed.2011.02.018</ArticleId>
<ArticleId IdType="pubmed">21439700</ArticleId>