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Is there an association between bacteriological drinking water quality and childhood diarrhoea in developing countries?

Jensen, P. K.; Jayasinghe, G.; van der Hoek, W.; Cairncross, S.; Dalsgaard, A.
Tropical Medicine & International Health, 2004; :1210
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pub_id
15548318
pubmedid
15548318
ISI
225188100011
reference_type
Journal Article
author
Jensen, P. K.; Jayasinghe, G.; van der Hoek, W.; Cairncross, S.; Dalsgaard, A.
title
Is there an association between bacteriological drinking water quality and childhood diarrhoea in developing countries?
secondary_title
Tropical Medicine & International Health
ISBNISSN
1360-2276
volume
number
pages
1210
year
2004
abstract
To investigate the association between bacteriological drinking water quality and incidence of diarrhoea, we conducted a 1-year prospective study in the southern Punjab, Pakistan. Diarrhoea episodes, drinking water sources and drinking water quality were monitored weekly among children younger than 5 years in 200 households. We found no association between the incidence of childhood diarrhoea and the number of Escherichia coli in the drinking water sources (the public domain). A possible trend was seen relating the number of E. coli in the household storage containers (the domestic domain) and diarrhoea incidence, but this did not reach statistical significance. Faecal contamination levels in household water containers were generally high even when the source water was of good quality. Under conditions such as this, it is questionable whether public water treatment will have a significant impact on the incidence of endemic childhood diarrhoea.
keywords
drinking water contamination; Escherichia coli; diarrhoea; water quality; sanitation; Pakistan Escherichia-coli; disease; contamination; transmission; enumeration; coliforms ; Child, Preschool; Colony Count, Microbial; methods; Developing Countries; Diarrhea; epidemiology; microbiology; Drinking; Endemic Diseases; prevention & control; Environmental Exposure; adverse effects; Escherichia coli; isolation & purification; Feces; microbiology; Household Articles; Humans; Incidence; Pakistan; epidemiology; Prospective Studies; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Risk Factors; Water Microbiology; standards; Water Supply;
secondary_author
place_published
publisher
number_of_volumes
tertiary_author
tertiary_title
edition
date
Nov
type_of_work
subsidiary_author
alternate_title
Trop Med Int Health
call_number
accession_number
15548318
custom_1
WOS OK
custom_2
Unknown
custom_3
custom_4
10.1111/j.1365-3156.2004.01329.x
custom_5
Free
custom_6
10
label
2016-10-19
notes
Article
url
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=15548318
author_address
Univ Copenhagen, Dept Int Hlth, Inst Publ Hlth, Blegdamsvej 3, DK-2200 Copenhagen N, Denmark Univ Copenhagen, Dept Int Hlth, Inst Publ Hlth, DK-2200 Copenhagen N, Denmark Int Water Management Inst, Colombo, Sri Lanka Univ London London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Dis Control & Vector Biol Unit, London WC1E 7HT, England Royal Vet & Agr Univ, Dept Vet Pathobiol, DK-1870 Frederiksberg C, Denmark
library
TMI1329 10.1111/j.1365-3156.2004.01329.x 15548318
date_accepted
date_online
created
2004-12-23 11:02:08
modified
2016-07-08 00:00:00
library

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<ArticleId IdType="doi">10.1111/j.1365-3156.2004.01329.x</ArticleId>
<ArticleId IdType="pubmed">15548318</ArticleId>