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Talking dirty: how to save a million lives

Int J Environ Health Res, 2003; 13 Suppl 1:S73-9
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pub_id
12775382
pubmedid
12775382
ISI
183560700009
reference_type
Journal Article
author
Curtis, V.
title
Talking dirty: how to save a million lives
secondary_title
Int J Environ Health Res
ISBNISSN
0960-3123
volume
13 Suppl 1
number
pages
S73-9
year
2003
abstract
Infectious diseases are still the number one threat to public health in developing countries. Diarrhoeal diseases alone are responsible for the deaths of at least 2 million children yearly - hygiene is paramount to resolving this problem. The function of hygienic behaviour is to prevent the transmission of the agents of infection. The most effective way of stopping infection is to stop faecal material getting into the child's environment by safe disposal of faeces and washing hands with soap once faecal material has contaminated them in the home. A review of the literature on handwashing puts it top in a list of possible interventions to prevent diarrhoea. Handwashing with soap has been calculated to save a million lives. However, few people do wash their hands with soap at these critical times. Obtaining a massive increase in handwashing worldwide requires a sea-change in thinking. Initial results from a new programme led by the World Bank, with many partner organisations, suggest that health is low on people's list of motives, rather, hands are washed to remove dirt, to rinse food off after eating, to make hands look and smell good, and as an act of motherly caring. Professional consumer and market research agencies are being used to work with the soap industry to design professional communications programmes to reach whole populations in Ghana and India. Tools and techniques for marketing handwashing and for measuring the actual impact on behaviour will be applied in new public-private handwashing programmes, which are to start up soon in Nepal, China, Peru and Senegal.
keywords
secondary_author
place_published
publisher
number_of_volumes
tertiary_author
tertiary_title
edition
date
Jun
type_of_work
subsidiary_author
alternate_title
call_number
accession_number
12775382
custom_1
WOS OK
custom_2
Unknown
custom_3
custom_4
10.1080/0960312031000102822
custom_5
custom_6
10
label
2016-10-19
notes
Journal Article Journal Article
url
author_address
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK. val.curtis@lshtm.ac.uk
library
12775382 10.1080/0960312031000102822 3H7V5TL38YN95MDD 22660196
date_accepted
date_online
created
2003-07-30 14:40:09
modified
2016-07-08 00:00:00
library

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<ArticleId IdType="pii">3H7V5TL38YN95MDD</ArticleId>
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