Noemi Kreif PhD

Assistant Professor in Health Economics

Background

 

Noemi Kreif is a lecturer in health economics.  She has been awarded a 3 years UK Medical Research Council Early Career Fellowship in the economics of health, on improving statistical methods to address confounding in the economic evaluation of health interventions.  Her current work focuses on translating advanced causal inference methods to health economic evaluation and decision modelling, in the complex settings of longitudinal confounding.  

Affiliation

Centres

Teaching

I am a seminar leader for the MSc courses: Economic Evaluation, and Introduction to Health Economics, at the LSHTM.

I also co-organise the LSHTM short course "Methods for addressing selection bias in health economic evaluation" ( http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/cpd/smasbhe.html ).

 

Research

I am interested in applying and extending approaches from the causal inference literature, to the economic evaluation of non-randomised health interventions and policies. My current research areas include translating advanced causal inference methods, such as targeted maximum likelihood estimation, to health economic evaluation in complex settings with longitudinal confounding. My previous research include the extension of the generalised propensity score method with machine learing, and  the use of the synthetic control approach to evaluate health policies.  My PhD, linked to the ESRC funded project (RES-061-25-0343), compared statistical methods for addressing selection bias in economic evaluations that use patient-level observational data. 

 

Please see related research outputs from the project:

http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/php/hsrp/reducing-selection-bias/ 

You can also find my list of  publications under my Academia profile..

http://lshtm.academia.edu/noemikreif

.. and my refereeing activity:

https://publons.com/author/420269/noemi-kreif#profile

Research areas

  • Economic evaluation
  • Health technology assessment
  • Statistical methods

Disciplines

  • Economics
  • Statistics
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