Professor Michel Coleman BA BM BCh MSc FFPH

Professor of Epidemiology and Vital Statistics

Background

Since 1995, he has been Professor of Epidemiology and Vital Statistics at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. He was Deputy Chief Medical Statistician at the Office for National Statistics from 1995 to 2004 and Head of the Cancer and Public Health Unit at the School from 1998 to 2003. He has previously worked for the World Health Organisation at the International Agency for Research on Cancer in Lyon (1987-1991), and was Medical Director of the Thames Cancer Registry in London (1991-1995). His main interests include trends in cancer incidence, mortality and survival, and the application of these tools to the public health control of cancer.

Affiliation

Centres

Teaching

He teaches on the MSc Epidemiology and other Master's courses, and supervises research degree students. He co-directs the annual short course on cancer survival with Dr Bernard Rachet and Dr Claudia Allemani, and is often invited to teach in other countries.

Research

We are funded by Cancer Research UK as the Cancer Survival Group to quantify, describe and explain patterns and trends in cancer survival by socio-economic group, geographic area and ethnicity, in collaboration with many research partners in the UK and around the world. We develop methodology and tools for survival analysis. We maintain a STATA program for relative survival analysis (strel2), freely available on the web; it has been downloaded by more than 400 partners world-wide. We produce cancer survival estimates at various geographic levels for the NHS, Government and NHS England for the NHS Outcomes Framework Indicators and the Public Health Framework Indicators.

In August 2008, we published the first world-wide comparison of cancer survival up to 1999 among 1.9 million patients diagnosed with cancer of the breast (F), colon, rectum or prostate in 31 countries on five continents (CONCORD study).

In March 2015, we initiated global surveillance of cancer survival, by analysing individual data for 25.7 million patients diagnosed during the 15 years 1995-2009 with one of 10 cancers, in collaboration with 279 cancer registries in 67 countries world-wide (CONCORD-2 study).

Research areas

  • Capacity strengthening
  • Disease control
  • Equity
  • Global Health
  • Health care policy
  • Health inequalities
  • Health outcomes
  • Health policy
  • Health systems
  • Inequalities
  • International comparisons
  • Public health
  • Statistical methods
  • Surveillance

Disciplines

  • Demography
  • Epidemiology
  • Medicine

Disease and Health Conditions

  • Cancer
  • Cervical cancer
  • Non-communicable diseases

Regions

  • Arab World
  • Caribbean small states
  • East Asia & Pacific (all income levels)
  • East Asia & Pacific (developing only)
  • Euro area
  • Europe & Central Asia (all income levels)
  • European Union

Countries

  • Algeria
  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Argentina
  • Australia
  • Austria
  • Belarus
  • Belgium
  • Brazil
  • Bulgaria
  • Canada
  • Chile
  • China
  • Colombia
  • Croatia
  • Cuba
  • Cyprus
  • Czech Republic
  • Denmark
  • Ecuador
  • Estonia
  • Finland
  • France
  • Gambia, The
  • Germany
  • Gibraltar
  • Guam
  • Hong Kong SAR, China
  • Hungary
  • Iceland
  • India
  • Indonesia
  • Ireland
  • Israel
  • Italy
  • Japan
  • Jordan
  • Korea, Rep.
  • Latvia
  • Lebanon
  • Lesotho
  • Libya
  • Lithuania
  • Malaysia
  • Mali
  • Malta
  • Mauritius
  • Mexico
  • Mongolia
  • Netherlands
  • New Zealand
  • Nigeria
  • Norway
  • Paraguay
  • Peru
  • Philippines
  • Poland
  • Portugal
  • Puerto Rico
  • Qatar
  • Romania
  • Russian Federation
  • Saudi Arabia
  • Singapore
  • Slovak Republic
  • Slovenia
  • South Africa
  • Spain
  • Sweden
  • Switzerland
  • Thailand
  • Tunisia
  • Turkey
  • United Kingdom
  • United States
  • Uruguay

Other interests

  • Adult Mortality
  • Cancer Survival
  • Cause Of Death
  • Childhood Leukaemia
  • Data Protection
  • Effectiveness Evaluations
  • Epidemiological Methods
  • Ethnicity
  • General Practice Data
  • Global Health Initiatives
  • Incidence
  • Liver Cancer
  • Longitudinal And Survival Data
  • Low And Middle Income Countries
  • Missing Data
  • Multiple Imputation
  • Population Health Science
  • health systems and social inequalities
  • mortality trends
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